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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Brewed my second batch of beer this morning. Bottled up the first batch last night. Today I brewed a red ale. Seven hours into the fermentation, I'd say it's going the right direction! Oh, I found another good use for supers! :D

 

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That's pretty cool!! I haven't brewed my own in years. That's something I am going to get back into.

What's all that stuff floating in there? When we made it we had just had a simple package of stuff we mixed/cooked together and then put the 5 gallon jug in a closet for a month.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The floaties are the grain/hop sediments that the fermenting causes to rise to the top. The yeast will settle on the bottom. Once the fermentation slows way down (4-6 days), I'll siphon it off (leaving all the sediment behind) into another container for two weeks. Then prime it with sugar and bottle it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here we are 32 hours into the fermentation.



This one started off quite slow but is now a steady churning of activity. The stout I did was very wild and aggressive right off and died to a trickle within 2 days. Different yeasts. As soon as this one slows down, I'll take the tube out and put a rubber stopper in with a 3-piece air-lock for the remainder of the fermentation.

This is an extract. I'm in the learning phase. I'll do another one or two and then try my hand at all grain.

I have it in mind to try honey in a brown ale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
:shhhh: I told her I buy flowers to put in it for her, so she needs to let me use it in beer making. If I break it, I guess I'll be buying her flowers. :D
 

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Be careful with the honey. It adds alot of alcohol really quick but doesn't add tons of flavor. Really good beer shouldn't have much alcohol... Otherwise it will get you in trouble:lookout:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Really good beer shouldn't have much alcohol...
Actually it's just the opposite. Really good beer tends to have a fairly high percent of alcohol. Some of the beer I have in my "stash" are:

http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/259/1708 - 10.50% ABV
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/147/1160 - 10.50% ABV
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/3818/47228/?ba=prototypic - 9.00% ABV
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/10099/33832 - 12.00% ABV
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/147/57114 - 9.50% ABV

All are rated A. Have a look at the ABV that the top 100 beers in the world have: http://beeradvocate.com/top_beers

For kicks, look at the rating those low ABV beers have :):

http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/105/332
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/306/837
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/105/2280
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/75/232
 

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Ah, home brew.... I may not know bee's that well yet, but I know home brewing. Been at that for about 5 years and have actually won several awards.

It's looking good, but something you might want to look into. I quit using a secondary years ago unless I was making a fruit beer or such that required an addition and long fermentation on those additives. Your beer will be just as clear letting it settle in the primary for 14 days (total fermentation time), racking it off into a bottling bucket, priming it and bottling it. And you won't get any off flavors from dying yeast in quite a long time, like three weeks at least. It saves time, washing those freaking carboys and one more chance to introduce an infection.

BTW, be careful washing and handling those carboys, I have seen a few really really bad situations from those. I too still use glass, but am hyper aware of them too. I keep mine in a milk crate, they fit really nice and protect it from inadvertent bumps that could cause it to break and gives you a secure handle too. And I don't mean to nitpick, just a safety pointer, that orange carboy handle needs to go, they put way to much pressure on the neck, especially when full, I have seen two of these break, one leading to the guy needing surgery to get his foot and leg all put back together. I would hate to see it and not say anything and then hear you had a mishap. Brewers code you know....

One other thing you might want to try, put a wet tee shirt on that thing, it will help keep your fermentation temps down and result in a cleaner tasting beer. Beer yeast are pretty temp sensitive in throwing off flavors when they are above recommended temps. I try to keep my ales at about 68 degrees. But then I have a fermentation fridge these days, makes it a lot easier.

If you are ever looking for a recipe let me know, I have good ones for about every style. Most are all grain, but they are easy enough to convert to extract too.

I am looking forward to the day I can make my own mead from my own honey. :D

I don't miss bottles, I started using kegs a long time ago. Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
 

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Actually it's just the opposite. Really good beer tends to have a fairly high percent of alcohol. Some of the beer I have in my "stash" are:

http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/259/1708 - 10.50% ABV
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/147/1160 - 10.50% ABV
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/3818/47228/?ba=prototypic - 9.00% ABV
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/10099/33832 - 12.00% ABV
http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/147/57114 - 9.50% ABV

All are rated A. Have a look at the ABV that the top 100 beers in the world have: http://beeradvocate.com/top_beers

You sir, have good taste in beer. :applause:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Your beer will be just as clear letting it settle in the primary for 14 days (total fermentation time), racking it off into a bottling bucket, priming it and bottling it. And you won't get any off flavors from dying yeast in quite a long time,
Hmmm, that goes against most everything I've read, but I don't discount your firsthand experience. Does this hold for all yeast types?

I keep mine in a milk crate, they fit really nice and protect it from inadvertent bumps that could cause it to break and gives you a secure handle too.
That's a good idea. I'll pick up a couple.

One other thing you might want to try, put a wet tee shirt on that thing, it will help keep your fermentation temps down and result in a cleaner tasting beer.
I've monitored my basement temps and it is pretty consistent at 68-69 degrees. Winter is a different story.

If you are ever looking for a recipe let me know,
I will.

I don't miss bottles, I started using kegs a long time ago.
Bottles work well for me. I can give away beer to friends. I don't go through that much beer (1 per day) and I'm quickly gaining a lot! :)
 

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Actually it's just the opposite. Really good beer tends to have a fairly high percent of alcohol.
I know that it usually DOES have more alcohol, I'm saying that for the purposes of my sanity it's best if it DOESN'T.:D I quit homebrewing because just flat tasted to good to say no to... I can't hang anymore.
But really, honey adds alot of alcohol without imparting much flavor and the alcohol will lessen the effects of your hops and malts so if you really want flavor it is easier to do at lower alcohol content.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I understand the first part, CP. Nothing to treat lightly. I'll keep the honey amount in check.
 

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Hmmm, that goes against most everything I've read, but I don't discount your firsthand experience. Does this hold for all yeast types?
I haven't had any problems at all and I have even used it with Irish Ale yeast which has a reputation for throwing some off flavors. If you check out some of the beer boards you'll see that the single primary is pretty common anymore for ales. I know it used to be a hard and fast rule to rack it, but that changed pretty quick about three years ago and some changes take a while to make it into the books.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/secondary-fermentation-rack-not-rack-155255/

Read post 3.

And if you don't have Palmers 'How To Brew', put it on your xmas list.

My standard for ales anymore is, Make a starter two days before, brew, pitch, 14 days later I keg it.

To be honest with you, I hardly drink any beer, my wife drinks about 3 or 4 a week, my friends and family are really happy, and I am obsessed with the science and challenge of making a really good beer.
 
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