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This is my first season as a beek and I'm loving it!. Currently have 2 strong hives from packages installed in new Langstroths. Two deeps and a honey super on each. Population seems strong, bearding every day...covering the front of the hives. I've either seen queen directly, or at least eggs and larva every week or two. I've been feeding them sugar syrup with essential oils to help them draw out the supers. I figured I would leave anything that they put in the super for them over winter. Over the weekend I made a screened 4 top mason jar feeder, because I couldn't keep up with them feeding off one jar. Now they are taking 1/2 gallon a day...still barely able to keep up!

I'm guessing we're in a dearth, as I've noticed lots more bees hanging out around the house than I've ever seen before. At this time of year I guess I can't leave my gallon jugs of SS sitting out...had a bunch bees hovering in the wood shed on Sunday.

When fall and winter roll around, what do I do with any capped honey in the super? It will have SS in it so I don't want to extract it. Do I just take the excluder out, and let them winter in all three boxes?

Any comments or suggestions are greatly appreciated!
 

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I've got 2-gallon top feeders on mine. We tend to mix 5:3 syrup as 10 cups sugar to 6 cups water, making about 3/4 gallon.

Either of my hives can make that much vanish in under 24 hours. Of course, they're stashing it away, not consuming it that fast. If they keep taking it that fast they'll likely fill up all available space for brood and get honey-bound (using the term "honey" loosely). But, like you, I'm trying to encourage drawing comb in first year hives, hoping to leave each hive with at least a medium super of stores above the brood to move up into this winter.
 

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Printerman if you leave the super on over winter it will provide food for spring, but you'll also run the risk of getting eggs laid there early next year. Dirty comb. Assuming the comb is drawn in the super it Might be better to hold off feeding until later in the fall then start with with 2:1 without the super.
I assume you can winter in two deeps
Just don't leave the excluder on if you do leave the super on the hive.
 

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It is suggested fall/winter management to remove the excluder for the winter. The cluster will not abandon the queen. Many hives perish with food less than an inch away. It may dirty the combs a bit if the queen starts laying before you get back in, but the wax moths will destroy all of it when the hive dies.
 
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