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What size bit do y'all use to cut out feeder holes out of outer covers? What do you plug them with when you are not feeding?
Kingfisher
 

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i use gallon (new) paint cans directly on the top bars with an empty deep or 2 supers on top, then the cover. good luck,mike
 

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A hole saw that is used for cutting out door handle holes. And then, under the cover, use canvas or tar paper for an inner cover. That's what one friend of mine does.

Most of the commercial beekeepers that I know use feeders inside of their hives, not on top. In these 4 way palleted hives, the feeders are on the inside side of the hive so when feeding one doesn't have to completely remove the cover. And when you want to make splits, you don't have to lean over the feeder. And they are always there, where you can find them. You don't have to store them some where else.
 

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What size bit do y'all use to cut out feeder holes out of outer covers? What do you plug them with when you are not feeding?
Kingfisher

1.5" Hole cut out using a quality hole saw or Forstner bit
1.5 Cap plug like the one used for hydralic hose couplers
I use the STOCKCAP T-240 series. They onley cost $0.15/cap plus shipping.
www.caplugs.com is another good source.
If you need a few caps try the size used on one gallon containers

Ernie
 

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If you're trying to accomodate mason jar sized lids you'll probably have to use a 2 3/4in hole. That size is very tight. On the other hand the next 'common' size is too big. If you cut out the hole with hole saw you can keep the 'hole' and nail it to a square of plywood for a cover when not in use.
 

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I don't cut a hole in mine. I find its easier to just lay the feeder on the top bars with an empty super covering and the top over that. Sure they may draw out some burr comb once in awhile but its easy and quick to do plus you don't have caps that come out, break, etc.
 

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Randy Oliver, solders a brass insert made for plastic ice maker line tubing, in the top of his mason jar lids.

Only need a 1/8" or so hole in the migratory tops. They work well for him.
 

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If its a migratory top? The purpose for it is to keep the bees in when Moving them. Drilling holes in them is not wise, simple things to use for your need of top feeding a empty deep place the feeder on the top bars and place cover on. And don't drill holes in your equitment.
 

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Many commercial beeks have a hole the same size as a mason jar lid. When they are not feeding they have a plastic plug like Ernie pointed out to plug the hole. This way there are very few bees to deal with when changing jars or pails. If you have hundreds of hives and don't want to use inside feeders this is the way to go. Hauling around hundreds of empty boxes(supers) to put your feeder jar/pail in just isn't feasible.
 

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If its a migratory top? The purpose for it is to keep the bees in when Moving them. Drilling holes in them is not wise, simple things to use for your need of top feeding a empty deep place the feeder on the top bars and place cover on. And don't drill holes in your equitment.
:DYou may want to check out those Caplugs or the T-240 STOCKCAPS
There must be a reason that they are used by many of us.
The plugs are tapered so that they snap into place.
Ernie
 

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In a post by Ross he said that he just cut a hole in the hive top to invert his feeder. I used this method by cuting a hole with a 2 3/4 hole saw and smoothing the edge a little with a drum sander. A perfect fit for a mason jar or invert a paint can feeder.But save the doughnut out of the holesaw and glue and nail it to a 3/4x 4x4 block to cover the hole. The bees will stick it down to the top....works great.
 

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I use two quart mason jars and cut a hole in the top of the hive so I can place the jar on top of the cover. This is beneficial because I can change the feeder without opening the hive. I don't have to go into the hive and disturb them every couple of days when they are feeding heavily. When I take the jar off, I just put another mason jar lid in place until they need to be fed again. If you were transporting the hives, I do not know if the mason jar lid would work well. I don't smoke the bees when I change the feeder, and if I get stung working the bees it is almost always when I am changing the feeder because sometimes they fly out of that hole immediately when I remove the jar. They don't seem as concerned about the big picture as I am.

The weather here is sufficiently mild that I use a migratory top all the time and no inner cover. I have many fewer hive beetles since I quit using an inner cover. During cold spells, I put another hive body and lid on top of the migratory cover to hold heat in and keep the syrup from freezing or getting too cold. I can still feed with out opening anything up except the mason jar hole for a second or so. None of these were my ideas, but they have worked well for me.
 
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