Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got home with my bees. Its turned cold and windy here. Temp is supposed to get down around 40 tonite. I would like to wait until tomorrow to hive my packages. They were clustered when I picked them up at Weavers but they broke cluster when they warmed up on the way back. Should I bring them in the house tonite or put them in the garage in some empty hive bodies? Or none of the above? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
i think the garage should be fine, i would put the whole unopened package in an empty hive body,no frames,and put a lid on to help them conserve heat tonight.when i hive a package i usually stick an extra hive body without frames on top of the brood box with the frames/foundation,i shake the bees in,having taken the queen out already of course,then put the empty package box inside the empty hive body.stray bees will filter down within a few hours.this method is good for cold days as it keeps the wind off the bees and you loose less stragglers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the quick replies. They came with a can of syrup. I'm guessing they will have enough feed for tonite. Ian thanks for pointing me to the post on the bee forum, I dont know how that one escaped me.
James
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
Generally they only ship them with enough to get them there, because the post office has a habit of spilling syrup all over them. I would feed them to be sure. I ALWAYS feed them before I hive them. Full bees are much better behaved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The temps are a moot point. The sun came out and I hived both packages. That is absolutely the neatest and weirdest thing I've ever done. I was suprised by the amount of bees in the air, they were all over me. I wore a long sleeve white shirt,tan pants and a veil and got by okay. I got one sting on the hand with the second hive and a bunch more started to try to get me there so I put on the gloves to finish. Many thanks to this forum, there is no way I could have done that without the certainty that others did and enjoyed it.
James
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,340 Posts
>>absolutely the neatest and weirdest thing I've ever done.
>>I got one sting on the hand with the second hive

James, welcome to the world of beekeeping. Keep us poasted with the activities of your hives...

Ian
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
My guess is, that if you'd fed them before you hived them them would have been much calmer. There is only limited access to the feeder with all those bees in the cage and many are hungry. But you've got them in a hive now. They are probably much happier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
690 Posts
GalvestonCo,

"posted March 29, 2003 02:43 PM"

That would be Central time right?
I realise that the temperature point is moot but isn't that a tad bit early in the day? My concern would be that there would be enough time remaining in the day for the bees to fly and could possible orientate to just one hive. I've read somewhere it is best to wait til dusk. I guess this point is moot as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
James,
I picked mine up yesterday too, and it was very windy and forcast to get in 30's last night, so I put off hiving. Wish I'd read this last night, hope I still have live bees in package this morning. It's calm and supposed to be back in 70's today, so I'll try late this afternoon.....Think I'll have gloves handy after reading your experiance.

Dave
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
I always feed them before hiving them and they have never gotten angry. They do fly a lot. If you have bees in a cage I would feed them when they first arrive and before you hive them minimum. If you keep them in the cage for a day or two, I'd feed them twice a day. You can decide if you want to use the brush or the spray bottle. I've used the brush method for 30 years and the only problem I've ever had with packages is once when one package moved in with the package in the hive next door. It don't think it's related to the brush.



Also, I wouldn't put them in the garage on a cold night, I would keep them in the house.

[This message has been edited by Michael Bush (edited March 30, 2003).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi all, thanks for the replies. Mike I did feed them about 30 min before hiving and a few minutes before also. I was surprised at how many bees were flying but they werent aggessive at all. I think I did something to provoke the one that stung me but I was so intent on what I was doing I didnt even look, I just brushed him off. The reason I hived them when I did was because It was going to be cold again when it got close to dark. I may have messed up but it looked like now or never to me. Anyway both hives are active now, I can just hope for the best till next week when I can check inside. Dave, good luck with hiving yours. Did you meet Clint Weaver? He was handling things when I got there about 9:30. If youve never had bees like me just go slow no matter how chaotic it seems and the bees let you do your business. Really amazing. And dont take the cork out of the wrong end of the queen cage like I did in a moment of minor panic. She was coming out quick I stuck it back in.
James
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
James,

Thanks, I got them hived this afternoon. Two packages in single deeps with plasticel foundation and one in two mediums of Permacomb. Clint was still there when we were about 11:30. They are not easy to find, but I think the bulk of their bees go out in the mail. Good luck with yours.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thank goodness, I'm not the only one who panicked on their first install... After all the reading and classes, I too popped the cork end of my queen cage... and put the inner cover on and was walking away before I realized what I'd done. Fortunately, she was still hanging out in their when I reopened and stuffed the whole with a nearby piece of branch. We'll see tomorrow how that worked out. Here's hoping! Good luck to you.
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
When you're starting out panic is a very familar feeling.
So many things to think about because they are all new and bees flying everywhere. It takes some getting used to until you realize they aren't after you. After you've had thousands of bees after you, you realize the difference in the sound.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top