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I did a lot of reading of what other folks have done/recommended and came up with a list of what seems to have worked for my 2 hives I started this year from packages
Best thing to anchor them is a bar of open brood from another hive if you have it. (I did not have)
Next best thing is empty old brood comb to attach to one of the top bars. ( I did not have)
Coat the inside of the hive body with beeswax but do not coat the top bars themselves.
Dab a couple spots at the entrance with lemograss oil using a qtip and a dab or 2 inside don't over do it I did this a few days before the bees arrived
If you have a screened bottom close it off so no light shines through.
Reduce the entrance so they can defend it.
I did not cage my queens but they did had their wings clipped.
Use a divider board and only give them 9-11 bars to start with.
I fed them sugar syrup with a inverted jar feeder that was on the back side of the divider board so I could re-fill it without opening the hive itself. I fed them for a couple of weeks till they had about 4-5 bars well built out and were starting to store honey/syrup on them
 

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I am in my second year as a beekeeper. I have hived 4 packages with zero absconding.
I agree with typhoontx for the most part.
I did not use a bar of open brood, but I hear it is great.
1st year I did not use old brood comb, but I did the second year.
I did not have wax to coat the inside of the hive body, I used a coat of shellac.
I do not have screened bottoms, but if you do make sure they are closed tight.
1st year I direct released the queens, due to how long they spent in the package together. 2nd year I hung the queen cage for 3 days.
I do not use a divider board.
I fed 1:1 sugar syrup until a nectar flow started, baggie feeder.
I closed all entrances except a single 1 inch hole.
I did the install in the late afternoon.

My ktbh hives are the same dimensions as Wyatt A. Mangum (Ph.D.), as outlined in his book.
 

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I did a lot of reading of what other folks have done/recommended and came up with a list of what seems to have worked for my 2 hives I started this year from packages
Best thing to anchor them is a bar of open brood from another hive if you have it. (I did not have)
Next best thing is empty old brood comb to attach to one of the top bars. ( I did not have)
Coat the inside of the hive body with beeswax but do not coat the top bars themselves.
Dab a couple spots at the entrance with lemograss oil using a qtip and a dab or 2 inside don't over do it I did this a few days before the bees arrived
If you have a screened bottom close it off so no light shines through.
Reduce the entrance so they can defend it.
I did not cage my queens but they did had their wings clipped.
Use a divider board and only give them 9-11 bars to start with.
I fed them sugar syrup with a inverted jar feeder that was on the back side of the divider board so I could re-fill it without opening the hive itself. I fed them for a couple of weeks till they had about 4-5 bars well built out and were starting to store honey/syrup on them
This is my 2nd year, and I have not had any absconding either. I basically did what typhoontx did. Couple of exceptions:
- I did not have open brood, but I added some empty brood comb.
- Instead of wax, I coated the interior of the hive with a mix of propolis and isopropyl alcohol. I don't remember proportions off-hand, but they are in my notes here: http://happyhourtopbar.blogspot.com/2014/04/chris-harp.html The propolis smells good to them, but it also provides health benefits. Then I added a couple drops of lemongrass oil on top.
- I did, however, rub beeswax on the bottom of each bar (the side facing into the hive). This attract the bees to the bars.
- My queens were placed into cages the morning that I picked them up, so I left them in their cages for about 5 days. However, if the queens have been in with the packages for a few days, I'd probably do a direct release. A friend of my has done direct releases without any problems, but his queens were with the bees a few days.
- Might be overkill, but I like to hang branches in front of the entrance.
- I would wait until the late afternoon to install because they are more likely to stay inside the hive and there will probably be less drifting if you have more than one hive.

Definitely agree about reducing the space to 9-11 bars, closing up screened bottoms, and having minimal entrances. Also, resist the urge to check on them everyday -- this includes opening observation windows. Keep those windows closed because bees are "nice" girls -- they want a home, not a disco. ;)

Good luck!
 
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