Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday in the apiary it was humid and very warm, and I was fixed on inspecting a hive that had capped swarm cells a few weeks ago. The timing was right, the queen should have been back from a mating flight. There were bees on the landing board and on front of the hive fanning, or so I thought, I gave them a small puff of smoke; I was down 2 supers when I realized they were nasonoving a newly mated queen back. Ugh, what a dope, I just wasn’t paying attention. To make the situation worse, I had a frame in my hand and watched a virgin emerge. :scratch: :( Did I royally mess this up. Will they keep two queens? I wonder why there was a cell in there when a queen was already hatched; is this one way that sister queens stay in one hive or is it usually a mother daughter? Thanks Deb
 

·
Premium Member
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
Frame in hand, newly emerged virgin, hive already has one virgin out getting mated. I would put that frame and all the bees on it in a nuc and see if she gets mated also. Maybe throw in a few more bees and some honey.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Being that I didn’t do that, what do you think will happen? I’m wondering why that cell wasn’t killed when the first queen emerged.
 

·
Premium Member
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
It may not have been far enough along for the first queen to have paid it any mind. Saw that recently where I had a few emerged cells, a lot of torn down cells, and two that had not been touched all in the same hive. Moved the two that had not been touched to different queenless hives and I am sure that at least one made it, not sure about the other. I think at this point it is better to let it play out. I would not want to be messing around in a hive with a newly mated queen trying to find one that wasn't. You may get a small after swarm, so I would be on the lookout to capture them if it occurs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,558 Posts
Being that I didn’t do that, what do you think will happen? I’m wondering why that cell wasn’t killed when the first queen emerged.
I have seen it described as the workers deliberately holding virgins in and preventing the first emerged from killing them. Maybe life insurance if the first queen does not make it back.

If you know how to word the search I think it could be found. It is out there.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It may not have been far enough along for the first queen to have paid it any mind. Saw that recently where I had a few emerged cells, a lot of torn down cells, and two that had not been touched all in the same hive. Moved the two that had not been touched to different queenless hives and I am sure that at least one made it, not sure about the other. I think at this point it is better to let it play out. I would not want to be messing around in a hive with a newly mated queen trying to find one that wasn't. You may get a small after swarm, so I would be on the lookout to capture them if it occurs.
The swarm traps have been ignored. Remember that thread in the beginning of the year about our goals for this year? So far I missed them all :rolleyes:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have seen it described as the workers deliberately holding virgins in and preventing the first emerged from killing them. Maybe life insurance if the first queen does not make it back.

If you know how to word the search I think it could be found. It is out there.
I’ll take a look, thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,681 Posts
Huber described the bees holding back queens so they couldn't kill their rivals.
Smart, those bees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Hello. I've had the same experience this spring. I caught the prime swarm may 3rd and on may tenth I had virgins piping. I made up four nucs from the largest cells and thought I was good to go. That hive casted off two more swarms and ended up queenless. I didn't leave any cells as I thought two virgins should suffice. I suspect that the virgin didn't come back. I should have left one cell. In the picture they bearded like this for three days, constantly fanning and miserable. On inspection, no queen, eggs and no polished cells. I gave them a nuc and now they are cranking along!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Bees do lots of things that aren't in the books. I watched something similar play out in my observation hive. The first virgin out killed the queen before the swarm could depart. Then that virgin got mated and was about to start laying but they were still holding virgins in queen cells. One of the virgins escaped and killed the newly mated queen.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top