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Discussion Starter #1
Say, I have been reading about various methods of supporting hives off the ground, wood, metal, bricks, etc., and need to know if cinder blocks will work. I expect that it will, but anyone use them. Too late and I have no carpentry skills to build wooden supports. Seems like the blocks are the least expensive and quickest fix. Ground is level.

Ron
 

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Hi RonS--the concrete or cinder blocks work just fine, I have used them for sitting hives on. Presently we are using fire bricks for hive stands, got a stack of the bricks so might as well use them.
 

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There are probably more hives sitting on cinder blocks than any other single kind of support. My first 6-hive stand is sitting on cinder blocks. More recently, I've been using short pieces of old telephone poles- cut `em to length with a chainsaw and lay them on the ground. They're creostoted so they won't rot.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
George,

I have one of those poles. I'm building a new house and the phone company put it four feet in front (literally) of my garage door. Phone company said it was my problem, but for a fee, they would remove it. Well, I just might steal your idea. Of course, we have racoons and skunks all over (in the TX hill country). Word is that if the hive is about 2 feet off the ground, these critters are not such a problem (given a heavy stone, or cider block, on the top.

Ron
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>Ground is level.

Ground is never level.


I lay eight foot treated four by fours down and level them with bricks. scraps of wood and digging out the lowest point Then leve them to each other and then put a row of six hives on the pair of rails. But then I also have top entrances to foil the skunks and the tall grass and the deep snow...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Michael,

The difference is that I am not smart enough to understand top entrances. I use top feeders. Maybe my next hive acquisition. Sure makes sense to do it that way, though.

Ron
 

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Buy some screen molding. Nail it onto three sides of the bottom of the top feeder. You now have a top entrance.
As long as you don't have skunks around you can get by with the rails and the bottom entrance.
 

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So Michael,

Just out of curiousity: I see these bees when they come in for a landing full of pollen so heavy they almost crash land onto the bottom board extension. If the entrance is on the top, what do they do? Crash into the side of the hive and stick? :confused:
 

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Depends on how high you make the entrance, if it's 1/2" or so they can fly right in and land on the topbars. The other thing you can do is add a piece of 1x2 to the hivebody on the side where the entrance is, this will give them something to land on. I have never had a problem with just propping the cover up with a shim.
 

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>Just out of curiousity: I see these bees when they come in for a landing full of pollen so heavy they almost crash land onto the bottom board extension. If the entrance is on the top, what do they do? Crash into the side of the hive and stick?

Admittedly mine are all small cell now, but they just fly right in the entrance. Maybe some of it too is that they get used to there being a landing board so they take advantage of it. Like you leaning on a railing if it's there. I've never seen them run into the hive trying to land, they just go in and land on the top bars inside or they land on the outside and climb in.

When I started doing top entrances I did put a one by two on for a landing board. But they never really used it so I just left it off.
 

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Ron,
I just got a hive in Nov and I started out with it on cement blocks. I soon discovered that ants in this area are attracted to the hive. I tried putting cinamon around the hive as suggested by some and also coated the blocks with vaseline as suggested by others but these methods did not work. I then built a small stand using treated 4x4s for legs and 2x6s for the frame. It was EASY and took less than an hour. You need only 1 six foot 4x4 and 1 six foot 2x6. I now have the hive on the stand and I have the legs sitting in plastic cans with a small amount of motor oil in each can. I have seen NO ants on the hive since then. This is something that you may want to consider if you have ants in your area.

[ February 11, 2006, 10:30 AM: Message edited by: NoviceBee ]
 

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Pallets. Any Loading Dock wants to get rid of them. I went on a collection spree and got one for each hive. Can fit four on each, so I'm set if a shortage comes.

Hawk
 

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I made some hive stands out of old used 2 X 4's and 2 X 6's and lost two so far to porcupines eating off one of the legs and spilling the hives on the ground.
The hives were tiped over and all the comb and bees were gone. Saw tracks in the mud and snow and the porcupines and skunks had a good sweet meal from these hives. Some of the frames were partly chewed up and eaton.
Clint
 

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>> I have no carpentry skills

I don't either, but I was able to build a simple square with four legs to use as a hive support. I used treated 2x4. Even for me, one of the foremost klutzes when it comes to building anything, it was not a big deal. I like having the hive elevated so there's less bending over. (Of course the other side of that coin is that when you add a few honey supers, they get awfully high.)

Concrete blocks are fine too. If you have more than one hive maybe you could try both schemes and see which you prefer.
 

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I watched some of the German videos and noted the poly hives they use. They seem to be top entrance but what really caught my eye was that they have a door incorporated into the base. Several scenes show them topping up feeders in the base.

The best I can get out of the video is a trademark of "Stockmann" but I can't find anything on the web.

Anyone know how these bases are made or know the factory we site ??
 

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2 or 3 cinder blocks with 2 lawn timbers layed on top make good hive stands for up to 4 hives. The disadvantage is that the lawn timbers might warp, paticularly if you dont have hives on top of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Ross,

You show-off. I saw all that woodworking equipment. If I tried that the only thing in pictures would be my severed thumb, and then if I was lucky. I used four 8X16 cinderblocks for each hive, placing two on the bottom and two on top in the opposite direction. Seems very stable. We do have skunks in our area, along with fire ants. I have thin nails for the skunks that I will arrange on the landing and Amdro for the ants. Our local association has a member who lost both her hives to fire ants. Novicebee, thanks for reminding me. I will arrange something, and fast.

Ron
 
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