Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My hive is an over wintered nuc that I received last year about the start of summer where I am. The hive had problems building up honey stores and expanding into the hive. Was fortunate enough to feed them enough to over winter. However the main problem now is that I see very little brood but the hive size seems to be increasing well enough for now. When I went out today I saw 2 developed queen cells and a few, no more than 3, "teacups". I haven't been able to find my queen and am wondering if I should let the hive supersede on its terms or should I destroy the cells in case they are swarm cells. I have actually never seen this queen while at my place, I am a first year with little queen spotting experience and think that this queen is a hider, the person I bought from said that she was one of those queens that is a hider and very hard to spot so I have been going off of laid eggs as a reference of the queen still being there. The hive has good honey stores for now and was wondering if these queen cells are swarm cells or not swarm cells. Both developed on a frame where the comb made a sort of trapezoid shape with both being on one of the slanted edges. the hive has fully expanded into 10 frames and drawn out maybe 5 or 6. Any and all thoughts are appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,286 Posts
Are the queen cells all about the same age or are they different ages? Are the cells on the ends/edges of the frames or in the middle? If the queen cells are different ages (some filled not capped, some capped) and the cells are in the middle of a frame I would suspect supersede. If you are not seeing much brood the hive may be superseeding a failing queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The two cells appeared to be the same age and the the first cell was about half way down the frame and the second was beneath that one and they were both integrated into the side of the frame, ie if the comb is facing me then it is at 90 degree, the cells were at a 0 degrees. Does this answer your question?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Went out at 4:10pm my time, to look at the hive. I saw what appeared to be a new queen, elongated abdomen with no mark. My previous queen had a red mark. She crawled up and out, flew around for about 30 sec and landed next to a few workers, they immediately oriented to her in a way I have never seen when with other workers and she then went back into the hive. Should I be concerned about swarming and if so what steps should I take, ie capturing a swarm, preventing one.
 

·
Registered
5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
Joined
·
2,547 Posts
Went out at 4:10pm my time, to look at the hive. I saw what appeared to be a new queen, elongated abdomen with no mark. My previous queen had a red mark. She crawled up and out, flew around for about 30 sec and landed next to a few workers, they immediately oriented to her in a way I have never seen when with other workers and she then went back into the hive. Should I be concerned about swarming and if so what steps should I take, ie capturing a swarm, preventing one.
no I would not be concerned about swarming.
I would leave them be for 10-15 days.
the more they get interrupted the more likely the smells and pheromones that need be present are not.

this is a time to step away, You seen a young queen so you are very likely to be fine, she needs to mature, mate ,then start laying, Hopefully you have drones out and about , there and get some decent mateing weather.

In 2 weeks or so check for eggs, brood and evaluate if you need to add space, Comb is better but if you do not have any then use what you have.
GG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
That's pretty cool that you got to see a queen fly and orient, she's probably a new queen getting ready for her mating flight. I agree with Gray Goose, leave them alone for two weeks. While you are waiting, pick yourself up a bright, fluorescent green queen marker and queen marking tube from a supplier if you don't have them yet. Next time you are in the and you see eggs, find her and mark her with the green paint. Don't worry about what color=year and all of that nonsense, with the bright green paint, you can see the queen from 20 feet away!
 

·
Moderator - In Memorium
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
Since blue is the color for this year, I would suggest a light sky blue color. Also very easy to see. The blue Posca paint markers from the bee supply houses are pretty dark. Give her at least two weeks to get mated and laying before messing with the hive again. Time is your friend. If you are lucky and watching the hive closely, you may get to see her return from her mating flights.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top