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I have converted some of my hives to Horizontal Langstroths. They use standard Langstroth equipment, but the box holds around 30 frames. We've had pretty good luck with them. My wife loves them because she can do all of the manipulations herself. She didn't like being relegated to "go-fer" status. The standard boxes were too heavy for her, and after stacking a couple of boxes on a stand, she was too short to look into them without a stool.

Now, I'm mostly the go-fer.

Anyway ... one of the boxes was not well made. The builder used plywood that was too thin, and now one side is beginning to buckle. I'm going to transfer the bees into standard Langstroths tomorrow and take the horizontal hive home for repairs.

My concern is whether I should move the bees back into the horizontal hive as soon as repairs are done (assuming I get it done quickly), or if I should just wait until Spring before I disrupt them again.

I live on the Mid-Coast of Texas, and our winters are pretty mild. We usually only get a couple of days below freezing, so I'm not too worried about the weather.

I doubt the bees would abscond this late in the season, but I'll put a queen excluder between the bottom board and the bottom box. I may be able to rig up a queen excluder for the entrance to the horizontal hive once the repairs are done.

Otherwise, I'm worried about how much disruption this will cause the bees, with two moves in a short amount of time.

Advice?
 

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My concern is whether I should move the bees back into the horizontal hive as soon as repairs are done (assuming I get it done quickly), or if I should just wait until Spring before I disrupt them again.

I live on the Mid-Coast of Texas, and our winters are pretty mild. We usually only get a couple of days below freezing, so I'm not too worried about the weather.

I doubt the bees would abscond this late in the season, but I'll put a queen excluder between the bottom board and the bottom box. I may be able to rig up a queen excluder for the entrance to the horizontal hive once the repairs are done.

Otherwise, I'm worried about how much disruption this will cause the bees, with two moves in a short amount of time.

Advice?
1. Two moves will be fine, just don’t use a screened bottom board in either the stacked or the horizontal hive. Don’t bother with the queen excluders in this application; they’ll cause more issues than they will solve. 2. Tell Jim Cole “Hi” for me.
 

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......Otherwise, I'm worried about how much disruption this will cause the bees, with two moves in a short amount of time.

Advice?
Your bees already have the nest configured for the horizontal setting (give their normal setting back to them as soon as possible).
If you wait until spring, now you are forcing the bees to reconfigure for the vertical setup.
Just get it done and done (rather soon), and everyone just moves on.
No need for too much concerns either.
 

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If it was my decision to make, then I'd leave the hive completely alone until next Spring, before addressing any repairs. If the plywood is seriously warped - then run a ratchet strap (or Spanish windlass) around the hive to hold it in place for the time being.

A thought: you appear to like running horizontal hives, and if you're capable of repairing one, then I'd bet you're also capable of building one from scratch - so why not make another hive, but using more suitable materials this time ? Then - come the Spring you could simply swap horizontal boxes over and conduct repairs at your leisure.

You don't mention using mesh floors, so I don't understand a comment being made about them - I'd say use them if they've proven to be of benefit, don't use them if they haven't. Simples. :)
'best
LJ
 
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