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I just did my first hive removal today. It was way more work than I bargained for. The hive was in a water meter box and the bees were using a tiny hole in the top for their entrance. The guy who called me and wanted them removed told me they had only been there a few weeks so I only brought one medium to use to hive them. I figured they should only have a couple of wafers of comb built in a few weeks. When I opened it up there were about six 2' x 2' pieces of comb that filled the entire cavity! Pretty fast work for bees that had only been there a “few”weeks! I pulled all the comb out, cut it to shape and rubber banded all that I could fit into the medium super. I cut about 10-15 lbs of honey off and gave it to family that I was removing it for and left out most of the drone brood. I then put the medium super about two feet away from the meter box. The meter box still had quite a few bees in it and I couldn’t get them out so I put the lid on the meter box and put a wire funnel over the hole they were using to get in and out. Everything seemed to go well and I watched a lot of bees enter the new medium. The problem is I just went back this evening to inspect the hive and see what was happening and many of the bees seem to have left their new home and have all clustered around the screen funnel to the meter box. I’m guessing that the queen is still inside the meter box. Is there anyway to get her out and get the bees to accept the new hive? I was thinking of using some fume board stuff. Will that get them out? With the queen? Any other ideas? I am wishing I would have made a bee vac like I was told!
 

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Shake the bees that are clustered on the cone back into the box, open the cover and very carefully "paw" round in the bees that are left in the meterbox, with any luck the queen will either climb onto your glove, or move around so you can see her. You could also brush them onto something like a dustpan or frame. In the removals I have done the queen usually is within the cluster left in the cavity, and if you get that cluster you will usually get her. She won't come out on her own, you'll have to go get her. The Bee-go might work, if your going to try that use just a tiny amount, it won't take much to get them to leave, I'm just not sure if the queen will leave to. Good luck.

peggjam
 

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From the now "expert", "all of two hives trapped out", I think if you wait 2 to 5 days for the queen to realise she has no brood, supplies, or bees coming in, she will leave and find the box.Just be sure the funnel is working and they cannot get back in.

It has happened for me both times since the forum helped me set up my first trap.
 

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>...told me they had only been there a few weeks

Whatever they say, about length of time, double it. However high they say bees are, double it. However many bees they say there are, halve it. And always ask if they sprayed them already and get them to agree NOT to or you won't come.

>I just went back this evening to inspect the hive and see what was happening and many of the bees seem to have left their new home and have all clustered around the screen funnel to the meter box.

I'd just brush them back in the box.

>I’m guessing that the queen is still inside the meter box. Is there anyway to get her out and get the bees to accept the new hive?

Maybe she's in there, but I'd guess it just that they are oreinted to that location.


>I am wishing I would have made a bee vac like I was told!

I don't like the bee vacs much. I've killed too many bees with them. A brush is much simpler, cheaper and less dangerous to the bees.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys for the help. I went back over yesterday and scooped out about 4 lbs more of bees from inside the water meter. I put them in the hive and then moved the hive to my bee yard. I waited a few hours and went back and got about another pound of bees out and that was pretty much the rest of them. These bees were not good cooperators and very testy. I may have to requeen if they don’t calm down. I only got stung seven times through my bee suit and gloves. Of course I have heard that it is common for normally calm bees to be extremely mean during an extraction.

Michael, In college our professors would tell us their test would only take 2-3 hours and we learned real fast to not double but square the estimated time. So a 3 hour take home test would usually take about 9 hours. I think I'm going to square this guys estimated time the bees were in his meter box!

Thanks again.

Josh
 

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Cheif: That is where a bee vac comes in handy, I wouldn't attempt an extraction with out one. IHMO.
Auburn, huh, I live south of you in Rochester, one day if your down this way Call me and I'll show you my bee vac. A good design is also in the plans section.
Sent you a PM.
 
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