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Discussion Starter #1
Ok I finally found the tree filled with bee's. I have a uncle comming to help with the removal "he has around 20 hives" what do I need to be prepaired with? I have the obvious_bee suit, smoker, gloves, axe, chainsaw, some large plastic tub's, large spoon, wedge's, sledge hammer, and my hive to put them in with some frames with foundation.
A few quick questions:

1 after putting the bee's and brood comb tied in the empty frames how long do I leave the tied in comb before I start to introduce my frames with foundation?And what do i do with the old comb melt it down or save it for a swarm lure?

2 Should I take the comb filled with honey and put it in front of the hive? or should I put on honey supers and wait till they draw it out then place some of the comb honey in front of the hive and let them rob it out?or better yet enjoy a early treat ;)

3 when removing the bees do I have to be very worried with finding the queen or will the bees just raise a queen from the brood if she is killed in the removal? Any tips on removal greatly appreciated as well.

[ April 22, 2006, 10:54 PM: Message edited by: Bubba ]
 

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IMHO: You can leave the 'tied' comb in the hive forever, alternate the foundation in between the drawn 'tied' comb. I never remove mine uless it becomes messed up (cross drawn/multiple layers) it stays in my brood chambers. If you tie it in they will chew through the cotton cord and drag it out, the same with rubber bands.
The comb with honey can be tied into frames,but, once you get to where the hive will be set up (I've found that way to be the most sucessful way) then put the frames where you want it. They will attach the comb to the frames amking the patch very strong. They will also fill in any gaps in the comb.
As long as their are drone brood and young larve (3-4 day old) they will make a queen.
A bee vaccuum is helpful also to catch the bees left on the ridges left by the removeal of the comb. Remember to put the brood in the center of the hive. If necessary you can complete the job at home, providing you've secured the brood comb where it belongs, leave as many 'nurse'bees on the comb as possiable.
Others will tells you to place the honey in a super on top of the hive, but, I tie it in frames after I get home and don't have to worry about it being jostled and bumped about in transport. It works for me. :D
Good luck.
If you wish to call me so I can explain more of what I mean PM me with your telephone# or let me know if you want mine. ;)
 

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"1 after putting the bee's and brood comb tied in the empty frames how long do I leave the tied in comb before I start to introduce my frames with foundation?And what do i do with the old comb melt it down or save it for a swarm lure?"

I also leave the comb in until it is beyond use. Most of the time you will find that their are short pieces of comb that will only fill part of the frame, and you end up with an empty frame with a short piece of comb tied into it, which works just fine as the bees will build it up into a full frame. I have also found that unwired frames are a must for these operations.

"2 Should I take the comb filled with honey and put it in front of the hive? or should I put on honey supers and wait till they draw it out then place some of the comb honey in front of the hive and let them rob it out?or better yet enjoy a early treat"

I wouldn't get real carried away worring about alot of honey being transfered into frames. Just a couple will put the swarm through in fine shape, then you can have an early treat.

"3 when removing the bees do I have to be very worried with finding the queen or will the bees just raise a queen from the brood if she is killed in the removal? Any tips on removal greatly appreciated as well."

I always attempt to find the queen and get her into the hive, as it will make your job much easier in the long run. But if you can't find her, they will make a new one as long as you provide them with a few eggs and larva of the right age.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks!
I think I am ready to get my first hive of bee's going. I feel like a kid on Christmas Eve. We are planning on taking them wednesday mourning or thursday mourning "weather permiting". So maybe I wont get stung up too bad!
Thanks for giving me all the useful information. I hope these bee's are as gentle in my hive as they were the other day when I spotted them. I was looking in the hole and they never even paid me any attention.

[ April 23, 2006, 08:51 AM: Message edited by: Bubba ]
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'll take the digital camera. How can I post my photo's ? Do I have to host them somewhere else?

Peggjam: It cant be all that bad, could it? I mean after all we are just cutting down there home and busting it up and then putting them in a new home ;) I just hope they dont go too wild on us.

Y'all have a great day!
 

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Of course it can't get tooooooo bad.
I think the most stings I've ever gotten from an extraction of 5 colonies in one house was about 600. When spread over 5 days, it's not too bad at all.
Have fun and be ready to do it by yourself when all you see of your helper is tailpipes. :D
 

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And measure the brood comb, espeicially the largest worker cells and the smallest worker cells.
Preferably with a metric ruler across ten cells.

But I've noticed I'm too distrated for pictures in these circumstances.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
We are going in my truck so if he waunts to leave it will be a looong walk.
Michael: I will try to find a metric ruler somewhere. I will report some sizes soon.
 
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