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Well today my wife and i are going to start making bottom boards and top covers should bee a fun day.We have about 500 board feet of red oak and maple and it should make some nice parts.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Have fun. You may find the red oak gets a little heavy. But you use what you have.
 

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I agree it is little heavy but it last way longer than pine.Plus i get the lumber for 50 cents a board foot.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Looking forward to seeing pics of the finished product. Ought to be really nice looking.
 

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White pine is lightweight but still strong,dries evenly,easily worked ,inexpensive and readily available in most of the US.If not in contact with the ground,it is decay resistant.
Both the red and white oak groups are open grain woods and absorb moisture readily.Note that they are never used for siding or outdoor construction.Oak is heavy and hard to work and is prone to splitting.When drying ,oak tends to cup and warp unless quartersawn.(this is why most oak flooring is narrow)Clear oak is also expensive.We would ship oak from CT to Quebec while pine was sawn locally for barn siding and construction grade lumber.
While maple is closed grain, it has many of the same characteristics as oak and again is mainly an "indoor"wood.
 

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White pine is lightweight but still strong,dries evenly,easily worked ,inexpensive and readily available in most of the US.If not in contact with the ground,it is decay resistant.
Both the red and white oak groups are open grain woods and absorb moisture readily.Note that they are never used for siding or outdoor construction.Oak is heavy and hard to work and is prone to splitting.When drying ,oak tends to cup and warp unless quartersawn.(this is why most oak flooring is narrow)Clear oak is also expensive.We would ship oak from CT to Quebec while pine was sawn locally for barn siding and construction grade lumber.
While maple is closed grain, it has many of the same characteristics as oak and again is mainly an "indoor"wood.
Ok i see what you are saying but if you use a top quality paint 2 coats or more oak and maple will last for years.Also before we put them in the kiln the ends are coated with end check paint.https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/sho...finishes/20099-lee-valley-end-sealer-for-logs
 

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n8app155,

Interesting! My father always coated the ends of newly cut logs with melted bees wax before letting the log air dry.

Cheers,
Steve
 

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Nothing wrong with that. I use oak and poplar for bottoms, telescoping covers, inner covers and whatever other equipment I need at the time.
If at all possible I use poplar and white pine for boxes. I have a few deeps and supers made from white ash, they are heavy and just used as backup emergency service now.
 

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Red oak is not very weather resistant but white oak has a closed grain. That is why some outdoor furniture used to be built with it. But hey! If we get wood cheap or free we will use most anything . I made a 8 frame medium with hickory. It was free wood. Rough on my planer (even the part of the board without the knots) and very heavy!
 

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Please be aware that red oak is like a bunch of soda straws and wicks up moisture which causes it to rot very quickly outdoors, even if painted. White oak is a better choice for outdoor use if you must use oak. Your maple will fair better in this respect. Both are very heavy, however...
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Cedar and cypress both make good hives but are typically more expensive than white pine. I use yellow pine for my shims and some side rails because I can find clear straight grained boards at the big box stores for the same price as common white pine. Too heavy for boxes though.
 

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Red oak is not very weather resistant but white oak has a closed grain. That is why some outdoor furniture used to be built with it. But hey! If we get wood cheap or free we will use most anything . I made a 8 frame medium with hickory. It was free wood. Rough on my planer (even the part of the board without the knots) and very heavy!
I know what you mean we got some black locust and built a hive out of it.Boy it was tough on our planer ruined a set of blades.We will never do that again.
 
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