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I’m looking for hive plans that use rabbit joints in stood of finger joints does anybody know where I can get some plans????
Thanks
Jay T
 

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Sides are 19 1/8" long and either 6 5/8 or 9 5/8
Ends are 13 3/4" or 14" 8 frame, and 16 1/4" or 16" for 10 frame
The ends get a 3/4 wide by 3/8 deep rabbet on each side, and a 5/8 wide by 3/8 deep for frame rest.
You need anything else?

This is for 3/4" lumber
 

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I find it irritating that the height of a deep is 9 5/8'' and a 1x10 is 9 1/4'' wide.
I used 1x10's to make some deeps this year because I had the 1 by's. After I made them I glued and nailed a 3/8 strip to the bottom of each deep. I have 15 of them this way, if and more likely when they separate from the 1x10's I will rip them down to Illinois supers.
 

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I make rabbit joints on a table saw. I use a crosscut sled and a dado blade. The sled, when constructed properly and accurately will make perfect joints. You never have to worry about the boxes not comming together squarely or have to be concerned about them sitting flat. Provided of course you use true lumber. As for the waste lumber by having to use a 1x12 instead of a 1x10 save it, there is a ton of uses, everything from slanted racks to telescoping covers.
 

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I made my first hive boxes today and it was much easier then I thought it would be and I have limited skills and tools. I made three medium supers using 1x8 (3/4x7 1/2) pine lumber, chop saw, and a dado blade installed on my tablesaw. Measurements brac posted are the same I used. I use Titebond III waterproof glue and 2" coarse thread screws. Here are a few pics of my results which I am happy with...not professional but I am sure the bees won't care. Everything is square and the boxes sit on top of each other nicely.



http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k289/cashton12/Bees/BeeHive3.jpg

http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k289/cashton12/Bees/BeeHive1.jpg

And no...those are not cracks in the wood even though it looks like it in the photos.
 

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You guys don't have problem with Rabbit Joints?

The first equipment I bout six years ago was dovetail joints. Five years ago I switched to finger joints. I've been making my own finger joints for two years now, and I love how well they stay together but hate how long it takes me to make it with my dato blade.

Last winter I bought some equipment off a guy who was getting out. He used rabbit joints. I considered switching to rabbit for the ease of construction, but those boxes have a hard time keeping right angles, and don't last nearly as long as the finger joints.

I'm still using my finger joint boxes from five years ago, and other than the corners being bent from prying the boxes apart, they are still in great shape. My rabbit joint boxes probably won't last two or three years. Then again I'm a little tough on equipment.
 

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I have rabbit joint boxes I made 10 years ago and they still look new
 

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Sides are 19 1/8" long and either 6 5/8 or 9 5/8
Ends are 13 3/4" or 14" 8 frame, and 16 1/4" or 16" for 10 frame
The ends get a 3/4 wide by 3/8 deep rabbet on each side, and a 5/8 wide by 3/8 deep for frame rest.
You need anything else?

This is for 3/4" lumber

Sides are 19 1/8? Sounds a little short. I think 19 7/8 ...other wise the frames will be awfully tight ... if they fit at all.
 

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19 1/8" side length is correct for rabbeted boxes. We use rabbeted boxes and have never had a problem with them coming apart or being out of square. Use Titebond II or III glue and we use 7/16"x1 1/2" staples. You will destroy the box trying to take them apart after the glue sets! Even with just staples, no glue, you will tear up the box trying to take them apart. :D
 

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I used 2" coarse thread screws. I messed up one of my boxes and need to remove the front/back and took the screws out and after just 15 minutes of setting the Titebond III had made it totally impossible to take apart. IMO the screws/staples/nails are there to hold the wood together until the glue sets and it's the glue that really holds everything together. Of course the fasteners offer extra support too.
 

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You will destroy the box trying to take them apart after the glue sets! Even with just staples, no glue, you will tear up the box trying to take them apart.
I used 4d galvanized nails and Titebond successfully. With some care in placement, the nails don't split the wood and the work goes fast; my boxes are holding up well. For other boxes, to avoid splitting, I've pre-bored with a tapered drill for galvanized screws, but it takes an extra step. I don't make a lot of boxes, so in the future, I'll use screws; I like screws even though they aren't that much stronger holding when placed in the end grain. The glue, joint configuration, and parallel grain surface area gives the real strength. The screws tend to pull the joints together better while the glue dries. JMHO. Paul
 
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