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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a call to go get swarm ( i know the poem; but just lost a hive) when I got there it was actually a small hive. In the rain, it looked like 4 or 5 lobes of comb, nearly the size of a cantalope on a cabbage palm frond. I cut and bagged the whole frond. They are in a bee bag, in the bed of the truck, waiting for the rain to stop.

Any pointers? This is new territory for me
 

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If the comb is in small pieces i find that using garden string and a threading needle (Yarn Darner) works good. Just tie & thread it around the top bar and within a week are so the bees will reattach the comb onto the top of the bar. I also reinforce the frame with 30 lb test fishin line by running it through the side bar eyelets by making an X. The bees will draw the comb just like they would foundationless. If there isnt enough bees to start a hive then just combine them with one of your weaker hives... Good Luck!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I wound fishing line, and tossed a rubber band or three on ( I was shy on rubber bands) The comb slid to the bottom of the frame. Should this be fixed to the top of the frame or should the bees work it out? I think (danger danger) I have a bare minimum for a start, which I am eager to do. I've a quart of syrup with honey b healthy on them, entrance feeder- which is also reducing the entrance of the NUC. The comb that was large enough to work with almost fills one deep frame. Should I rob a frame or two from my other hive? I did not want to open things up too much and initiate any robbing from one side or the other.


The wax was very fresh and soft, so I tried not to manipulate too much. Being new at this, I figured less was more in terms of messing with them. Maybe a 6x6 area of brood/larvae.

My understanding is leave it ten days and check for more eggs?

Thank you all for you help, I am eager to get some more hives running, but keep goofing up the cutouts, it seems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
IMO, I am not sold, probably a mix. They were right next to a driveway and no one has been stung, I walked around the palm, cut off the palm frond, placed said frond in a bee bag w/o getting stung. They got a little hot when I was transferring comb to a NUC, but I can't blame 'em there.

If I can attempt to read beekper, the fact the bees were in the open, rather than in a cavity implies AHB to many people. Along the I-4 corridor, AHB is maintaining a fair presence...FWTIW
 

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I have been working with AHB's for 18 years both in Tucson and Las Vegas. AHB has been in Fl for many years now and the AHB dominate the gene pool always. Judging AHB by its temperment is a poor way to judge the AHB.

First AHB temperment is split 3 way some are very hot like you hear about on the news some are about the same temperment as EHB and there are some that are even gentler then our EHB. Genes change fast in with the AHB and each time they change you can move into one of the 3 temperment zones. When you get to the Hot zone its to late. Swarms and small colonies of AHB will almost always be gentle once they grow up look out.

Nesting location seems to be a better judge of the AHB. For example in Tucson the city went from 1 or 2 infestations of bees in there water meters boxes a year with EHB to 800 to 1000 infestation with the AHB dominated gene pool.

Also swarm size can help judge AHB. The AHB may have many after swarms where they swarm with virgin queens. These tend to me small swarms the size of grape fruit or so.

In areas that have AHB my rule is if its an unmarked queen replace her with a marked queen from a known bee source. Hybreds AHB/EHB mix tend to be Hotter then just the AHB. Don't take the chance requeen and bee safe. I have seen to many dead animals and stung up people.

Its about being responsable if we as beekeepers don't police our selves and do the right things in AHB areas the government will out law bees in our back yards. Human fear of bees will always win, beekeepers are to small of a group to undo or fix laws against beekeeping.

All that said the AHB is one of the most amazing bees on earth.
 
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