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So what are you supposed to do when you aren't a landowner for beehive locations?

This is got me stumped. I live in the city. And I've people say good things about them being in the city actually, for where I am (Utah).

It seems like at some point, you have to figure out hot to let people put them there on their land, whether its relatives or friends, or whatever. How willing are people to let you do this if its not visible? Is this really hard to do? How long do people take to find places willing to let them put them out there?

(I was on youtube and people in London do this...I don't see why we're less of a good, friendly people than the British...)

How have other people worked this out, urban or otherwise?
 

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Most of my yards, people have asked me once they knew I had bees (and honey). Where I live is the opposite of urban, however.
 

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I find word of mouth works well, an ad in the local paper can generate a number of calls but in an urban environment it's likely to be for maybe one or two hives at any location. Even two hives at multiple locations you need to factor in time, travel and number of hives in the area. Like Bdfarmer, I'm not urban and find 5-10 hives per location less than 5-6 miles from my home yard to work the best for me.
 

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I've always had bees in my backyard, even when I lived in the city. I generally put them where people won't see them and where their flight path won't bother anyone. I never tell the neighbors. The ones who figure it out are usually aware of and sympathetic to beekeepers. The others don't recognize what it is. Telling people you are going to get bees creates irrational fear in most people. It's exactly the same as telling them your martian uncle is going to move in. They cannot comprehend the ramifications. When they figure out you have bees two years after you got them all of their fears have already not come to pass...
 

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People at work know that I have bees because I sell honey on the downlow. One gentleman was asking me lots of questions about raising and growing them like he was interested in having them. I said that I had, at the time 13, hives at my home and was getting nervous about my neighbors. He said, I have 200 acres, you are welcome to bring some out.

I did. Scored my first non-relative outyard. While not an ideal location it is better than overcrowding my backyard. I give him honey now. I left him a quart of creamed honey last week when I was at the farm working the bees. Today he showed up at my office trying to give me $ that I wouldn't take. Him and his family enjoy watching the bees and occasionally he sends updates via text.

Just bring it up in conversation and you will be surprised.
 

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I bet wearing some type of beekeeping t shirt or hat into/about town would get a few conversations started, probably more than you really want. When I'm carrying empty hives/boxes in the back of the truck I invariably have people approach me and strike up conversations (not so much when the boxes are buzzing, LOL).

I've found 3 types of people in those conversations. Those that are very curious, those that think you're crazy and those that are curious and think you're crazy.

But as mentioned above, I also try avoid my hives attracting any attention, an out of sight and out of mind approach. Bees, snake and Martian relatives tend to carry unfounded negative connotations.
 

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So what are you supposed to do when you aren't a landowner for beehive locations?

This is got me stumped. I live in the city. And I've people say good things about them being in the city actually, for where I am (Utah).

It seems like at some point, you have to figure out hot to let people put them there on their land, whether its relatives or friends, or whatever. How willing are people to let you do this if its not visible? Is this really hard to do? How long do people take to find places willing to let them put them out there?

(I was on youtube and people in London do this...I don't see why we're less of a good, friendly people than the British...)

How have other people worked this out, urban or otherwise?
Last spring I was about to move and did not want to hive packages at my house as they would be there for the real estate cycle.
I looked and only stopped in at places I "wanted" a whole different topic. There are good and bad places IMO. I asked 8 people to get 3 to say yes. Stop, knock, introduce your self, then do not make small talk too long , come right out and ask for permission to place your hives on their property. You will get a few questions and in 2 min you will see if they lean into the idea or are wiggling out. I do not force the issue or beg, I much prefer a win win, they at some point say they want bees there any way or some such statement. I would not have a paper on CCD or feature pamphlet, and try to bring them on board to save the bees. For me as a land owner, that would be a turn off. Any one comes on my property and attempts to show me the error of my ways is generally escorted to the gate.
GG
 

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Its best if you can keep the hives out of site.

On the other hand, if hives are visible, it's an excellent way to attract honey customers.

My personality will not sell honey. I'm not a salesperson, and do not want to be one.

I am not a beekeeper to make money.

That being said, the customers find me when they see my bees. I don't always enjoy the encounters.

I'm also not usually prepared for the encounters either, which makes them unpleasant.
 

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I had labels made by Better Bee that I put on my mason jar lids. They ask for bee locations and give my info. First site I got, paid for the labels. I run 800 to 1200 hives so I’m always looking for spots. I have an application on my phone where I can get a property owners info and contact them directly when I find a location with good potential. In SoCal spots are hard to come by but it is easier to find locations in North Dakota and Kansas where I also run my bees. For Urban locations I would suggest putting fliers on local bulletin boards or place an ad in a local publication or Craiglist type of thing. Bottom line is Ask, Ask and Ask some more. Many people hate/are afraid of bees but many people love them and will be willing to help you out. Especially if you offer to share the bounty with them. 90% of my locations are honey trade but some I have to pay cash for.

PS: When I started out I was not good at asking but necessity forced me to develop my skills.
 
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