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Personally, I like the idea of placing them along Stoneridge Drive adjacent to the tree line with the entrances facing East. No matter where you put them, the pool will be impacted to some degree.
This is where I would put them also. My yard is somewhat similar to yours, 1 acre with pool. If there is a lot of space between those trees perhaps plant some bushes in between to shield them from the road. As far as the pool is concerned I would not be concerned. We have some floats in our pool to allow small animals to escape that have fallen in (I was tired of pulling chipmunks and mice out of the drain baskets). The bees go to those sometimes for a drink. We also have a birdbath that we keep on the deck which they prefer. Bees have never bothered anyone hanging out or using the pool. I also have more hives than you will, 10 and counting. No worries. My neighbors love that I have bees and have even offered to let me place additional hives on their properties.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
My wife is really worried about the pool, so this may be one of those “sleep in the garage” moments for me.... Our pool is a saltwater pool, and she read that salt pools are particularly attractive to bees.

I’ll definitely set up a water source closer to the hives (2 max for me), but I have a feeling the bees will choose their fav water source, without considering where I will be sleeping at night!
 

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#1 with a fence. I have an acre and they travel a few feet then straight up and over the trees. I have a road in front of my house and the closest hives are about 100 feet away. Nobody cares and people walk freely for exercise. You may want to offer reassurance by either having an epi pen or benadryl and know how to kill a colony if necessary. As time goes on all will figure out that everyone can live in peace.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
No fences allowed in my neighborhood.
Thanks for the advice about the epi pen. How to kill a hive... that is something I hadn’t thought of.
 

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No fences allowed in my neighborhood.
Thanks for the advice about the epi pen. How to kill a hive... that is something I hadn’t thought of.
2 ways that I’m aware- big thick plastic garbage bag tied tight and wheelbarrow filled with soapy water. Necessary knowledge that I hope you never need to use.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
2 ways that I’m aware- big thick plastic garbage bag tied tight and wheelbarrow filled with soapy water. Necessary knowledge that I hope you never need to use.
Thanks. I also so a YT video of a BK who used gasoline (petrol). Just poured about 12oz or so on top of the brood and then put the lid on. About 5 mins later nearly all of them were dead. The fumes killed them... suggested doing this at night.
He was eliminating a hive that had disease to prevent nearby robber bees from visiting the diseases hive and thereby spreading the disease to other colonies.

The hardware for this method would have to be burned afterwards.
 

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Thanks. I also so a YT video of a BK who used gasoline (petrol). Just poured about 12oz or so on top of the brood and then put the lid on. About 5 mins later nearly all of them were dead. The fumes killed them... suggested doing this at night.
He was eliminating a hive that had disease to prevent nearby robber bees from visiting the diseases hive and thereby spreading the disease to other colonies.

The hardware for this method would have to be burned afterwards.
Sounds effective. Sometimes when you’re dealing with irrational fear and you support the very real intention of keeping the neighborhood safe, they ease up and can relax into the idea. My neighbors really like them and stop regularly to see how they are. The brave ones walk behind the hives into my beekeeper work space. I would encourage you to open up your space to the curious to safely show them how much the bees can be a great part of their world. Keep extra veils handy of course.
 

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Hi Rob,
I’d echo yours and other’s thoughts on the pool and water foraging. Without an alternate source your bees are guaranteed to utilize the pool.
Being in Michigan, I’m guessing the pool gets mothballed for winter. It’s possible, not a sure thing, if you establish your hive to a separate supply BEFORE you open the pool that they will leave the pool alone. People with pools or pool neighbors have succeeded at this. You CANNOT let the separate source go dry.
Location on your property won’t affect whether they use the pool.
Pete
 

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I'd be worries about forage, doesn't seem to be much and the lawns all look like putting tees. We had great success this past year with first year hives producing over 100 # of honey each and exploding populations. Pretty much beginners luck but also due to the COVID out break in March, no one sprayed for broadleaf or clover and with everyone home, a lot of neighbors planted or enlarged existing gardens-we never hit a dearth. Have you surveyed the area to see what you have for forage?
 

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Indeed, I agree that this would be the most likely concern. I have read through our HOA rules and there is no mention of bees. They mention limits on number of dogs/pets, and restrictions against farm animals. No mention of insects. I suppose an argument could be made that bees are farm animals, but I am willing so argue otherwise.

The HOA is a concern , thus my motivation to not have the hives in plain view from neighbors as they walk by. Our HOA doesn’t send around “patrol” cars looking for violations, but rather they respond to complaints. This is why I’m looking to be discreet. I seriously doubt that bee sting frequency will be increased, but the fear factor is very real for most people.

We aren’t permitted sheds either, but I could plant butterfly or other shrubs that could get tall enough to obscure site (and provide food).
In many areas, bees are considered livestock. So you likely are going to run into issues here. In my city I am allowed a limited number of hens, but all other livestock is banned (bees included). Most jurisdictions I see banning bees do so under a livestock ban, not a specific bee ban.



Regarding your pool, your pool is most like going to be full of bees, even if you provide a water source. The bees are attracted to strong smells and a pool smells just great to them (chlorine or salt water). I had a bee yard located out on a country lot, with several water sources in and around the yard, the neighbor 1/4 mile away through a small patch of woods had a pool. He claimed his pool was constantly covered in bees (which of course he was "allergic" to). The neighbor couldn't be reasoned with and rejected any compromise that involved the bees staying. The neverending harassment the landowner dealt with because of it (and threats of lawsuits) became to much for them to bear, despite being well within their legal right to have bees located on the property, and I had to relocate the whole yard on short notice. In our state hobby club, the question of "how do I keep bees out of my neighbors pool/hot tub?" is asked numerous times a year.

I perform dozens of cutouts (taking hives out of peoples structures) every year, and can tell you that any flying insect with stripes and a stinger is a "bee" to the average individual.


I wish you luck with your beekeeping endeavors, the first years are some of the hardest!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Thanks to everyone here for this information, albeit fairly depressing to read. In terms of forage, it is true that, like most these days, residents in this area have large green lawns with little else. In fact, one neighborhood up is built around a gold course, so Larry’s “putting green” comment is well deserved!

Still, don’t they keep bee hives on rooftops in some cities? I know they do this in Detroit. I guess I figured if bees can find enough food in a city like that, they could do alright in my area??

Guess if he thinks this area is a suicide for bees I’m going to have to evaluate with my bee teacher when the classes start up and consider placing my hive somewhere else (no clue where) or taking a huge hit and selling all of my second hand (but unused).
 

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Thanks to everyone here for this information, albeit fairly depressing to read. In terms of forage, it is true that, like most these days, residents in this area have large green lawns with little else. In fact, one neighborhood up is built around a gold course, so Larry’s “putting green” comment is well deserved!

Still, don’t they keep bee hives on rooftops in some cities? I know they do this in Detroit. I guess I figured if bees can find enough food in a city like that, they could do alright in my area??

Guess if he thinks this area is a suicide for bees I’m going to have to evaluate with my bee teacher when the classes start up and consider placing my hive somewhere else (no clue where) or taking a huge hit and selling all of my second hand (but unused).
Check at the local bee club for some one who has like 4 hives and has room for 10 more.
A person with a small farm for example. Keep there for maybe helping the guy with some farm chores.
Think thru the college buddy list and the co worker list someone may have the prefect place for bees.


I have 4 different places where I have bees, the farthest at my "family members place" is 4 hour drive away.

So distance is not a show stopper, depends on how bad you want bees. I was in a similar place 3 years ago as you. Sold the place in the "hood" and now am on 10 Acres on a gravel road, bees in the back yard. where there is a will there is a way.

for me here in Mich the prices and days on the market are ripe to sell that High Maintaince place and go rural. :) life is choices

GG
 

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Discussion Starter #34
One day I hope to move to a more rural spot for several reasons, but it's just not in cards for now with other competing priorities.
 

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I recommend inside the line of trees on Stonehenge, facing south, maybe with bushes to the north to stave off the northwest winter wind (since a 4ft fence is verboden).
 

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I would not be depressed, a problem is something waiting for a solution. I'm on a 7800 sf lot in downtown Princeton, NJ., a block from Princeton University, surrounded by other houses on similar lots. Probably 5 house within a hundred feet of my hives and have not had any issues with the neighbors except they keep asking for more honey after I gifted a few bottles last fall. I am told that the gardens in the neighborhood have never had better blooms and (this is a VERY liberal area) everyone is trying to save the pollinators by planting bee friendly flowers (and butterflies, bumbles etc., too small of lots to save whales). Your neighbor hood looks like its relatively new and people may start to discover their yards planting gardens etc. In NJ, the State governs bees and my lot (less than a quarter acre) is allowed up to three hives and one Nuc (no one would believe that we have such an "enlighten" government). I think you may be over thinking potential issues, the bees fly pretty much straight up from the hive and don't have any interest in people. Go for the area near the tree wind row for screening and put them in as much sun as possible. If one or two drop in the pool for a drink, it's not that big a deal. My comment on the clover was not a deterrent just food for thought-I always like the "you know your a beekeeper when your excuse for not cutting the lawn is that the clover is blooming". The bees will find something to eat or maybe catch one of your neighbors kids and fly off with them (naw, only kidding). There are weed killers that don't harm clover and personally, it gives depth to our small lawns. If anyone complains hit the with the "save the bees" and "environmental enhancement", do it with bugged out eyes and a crazy smirk - pretty much kills the complaint right off.

I'm attaching a photo of our home hives-make them look nice on a nice stand and you'll be in like Flynn with the neighbors. Notice the herb garden just behind them.
IMG_3196[922].JPG


Your right about forage in the City as I know someone who has rooftop bees in Brooklyn NY and he does pretty well with honey production. He get's $25 a pound for "Brooklyn local natural honey" from his hipster vegan neighbors -can't make this stuff up..(I think Mr. Spock was a Vegan)
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Thanks Larry... I should probably have a sweatshirt that reads "let me overthink this," because that is my tendency. As a scientist myself, I tend to think and think and think, which I consider the three necessary steps before I begin overthinking, which then occupies the rest of my thinking!
 

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As I said that I live in Princeton near the University where many tenured professors live. There are two Nobel Prize winners within 200 feet of my house and a former (deceased) next-door neighbor work with Opinhimmer on the Bomb as an MIT grad student during the Second World War. I keep hearing about all of the geniuses here but when you live here, just watch them try to back a car out of their driveway or cut their lawns...never a pretty thing.
 

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honestly the proximitity to the pool for any of these options isnt really likely to make much of a difference. looking at the line drawn for the last option (i believe it should read option #4 tucked behind some trees) i would put the hives on the left end of the drawn line close to the bushes next to the pool. and a water source near the right end of the line against your neighbors property. face entrances southeast to keep them tight to bushes while still leaving room to work behind. this will keep hives out of view from the street and away from property line. entrance faces away from pool and exposed to morning sun. bushes shield cold NW winter winds.
i wouldnt worry about lack of farage too much and be happy to be away from corn/bean fields. you bees will fly to US-12 without hesitation. plenty of small bodies of water nearby that i bet are surrounded by maple trees. you will learn to be a botonist. good luck!
 
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