Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a hive die a few weeks ago. I'm speculating that it was probably mites. Well the moths moved in and made a real mess. I pulled as much of the webs out but it is still pretty messy. I really don't want to waste the comb and throw it out. Is it too big of a task and too big of a risk at this point in the year to put those frames in a very healthy hive to clean up the mess? I've already frozen the frames.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,375 Posts
I had a hive die a few weeks ago. I'm speculating that it was probably mites. Well the moths moved in and made a real mess. I pulled as much of the webs out but it is still pretty messy. I really don't want to waste the comb and throw it out. Is it too big of a task and too big of a risk at this point in the year to put those frames in a very healthy hive to clean up the mess? I've already frozen the frames.
Do it.
Bees will only thank you.

If don't want to mix them in - keep them separate.
Bees will still fix the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
If they are frozen, you can scrape out the worst of it and let the bees do the rest. Any drawn comb is better than no drawn comb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
We lost one too last week due to moths. Ours was also a week hive and the bottom board was very nasty. I first hosed it off and then sprayed clorox water on it to dry. We froze the frames and cleaned any visible areas. I am glad you posted this because we wondered the same thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,269 Posts
The bees may not clean up the damaged frames if they do not need them for living or storage space. Your attempts at cleaning will only further damage the comb, brush off any loose stuff and leave for the bees. I would save the damaged frames as is, bagged to prevent reinfection with eggs. Or, A life time supply for you and all your friends of Xentari Aiazawa strain BT powder is under $40. Mix a teaspoonful in a quart of water and mist the damaged frames. You will cover them with a level of moth hating bacteria spores that will kill any wax worm taking a bite with the spore in it. Lasts on stored frames for several years. It does not hurt the bees! Just as we are a bag of symbiotic bacteria not harmful to us. The bacillus thurengensis is not harmful to bees. Freezer store your powder to prolong its shelf life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,375 Posts
We lost one too last week due to moths. Ours was also a week hive ........
Just to clarify - you did not loose your bees due to moths.
Moths do not eat bees, or infect bees, or kick the bees out, or do anything bad to your bees.

The moths are simply scavengers - taking advantage of a failed hive.
Healthy and properly sized colonies keep the moths under control.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top