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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thanks for the time to look over my question.

I wanted to post my planned hive configuration, which I hope to have set up next month and I wanted to solicit any negatives.

I already have a 2-Deep / 1-Med complete hive kit from last year, in preparation for this year as a new beekeeper. However, during that time I have learned more about the pros & cons and I've realized that for myself, smaller might have been better. With that said, this is what I have planned and I wanted to see if there's any issues that I might be over looking. I should add that the purpose for my hive is not so much for honey harvesting, but more for the entire experience, so honey production is not a goal at this time.

I plan to use a Deep and Medium as my brood chamber, followed by a Medium for the honey super. Will using a Medium as the upper brood chamber be an issue?


Thanks,
b1rd
 

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I run a deep on bottom and 2-3 mediums on top of that as brood chambers. A deep and a medium as a brood nest should work in CA with a mild winter.
 

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I plan to use a Deep and Medium as my brood chamber, followed by a Medium for the honey super. Will using a Medium as the upper brood chamber be an issue?
I think that will be a good configuration for you. Good luck with the bees!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies.

I do have a quick follow up question that I was going to post separately, but perhaps I can get it answered here.

Since I'm more in it for the learning experience, would there be any issues with using foundation-less frames in the honey supers, with the standard waxed foundations below? I am aware of the structural weaknesses of not have a foundation, but is there anything else I'm missing as far as why this might be a bad idea?


Thanks again,
b1rd
 

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I have used Single deep, deep+ shallow, deep+ medium, double deep, double+ shallow (or medium), and triple deep here in northern NY. All kinds of nuc configurations. They all work. Just find what works for you and learn to keep bees around that. I have see CA beekeepers that run triple deep hives. The only rules for beekeeping is to keep your bees healthy, fell fed, and disease free. I make honey in in supers w/o foundation quit a bit, harvested as comb honey. If you plan to extract then you should wire the frames or use bamboo skewers as support. Or you can crush and strain.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
...harvested as comb honey
Thanks.

From what I've read, comb honey sounds like something I'd be interested in learning more about, but I do understand there's some skill involved. And I was leaning towards the "crush and strain" method as well with either style.

Regards,
b1rd
 

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Thanks for the replies.

I do have a quick follow up question that I was going to post separately, but perhaps I can get it answered here.

Since I'm more in it for the learning experience, would there be any issues with using foundation-less frames in the honey supers, with the standard waxed foundations below? I am aware of the structural weaknesses of not have a foundation, but is there anything else I'm missing as far as why this might be a bad idea?


Thanks again,
b1rd
If you are not planning on extracting with a spinning extractor this should be fine. I would put atleast one drawn frame or frame with foundation in the super initially so the bees have a ladder to get to the top. Without a frame as a ladder the bees tend to build from the bottom up and you end up with more wonkey comb. Keep an eye on the super without any frames because bees tend to be more freeform (cross comb) in the comb orientation without foundation to guide them.

For the foundationless frames that I put in my supers I have found it works best if I start with a box of frames with foundation. I wait until the box with foundation is mostly drawn and capped. I then add another box and start checkerboarding in foundationless frames. This tends to result in less wonky frames.
 

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Thanks.

From what I've read, comb honey sounds like something I'd be interested in learning more about, but I do understand there's some skill involved. And I was leaning towards the "crush and strain" method as well with either style.

Regards,
b1rd
For comb or C%S if you leave a bit at the top and taper it , the "strip installation" for the next year is a step you can skip, I do extract the frame any way to get the last bit out. Setting it upside down on a sheet cake pan, over night would accomplish the same thing.

CScomb1_20180612_083113_2114.jpg CScomb2_20180612_083040_3345.jpg

so I cut about an inch off the top bar, then taper it like 30 degrees to a somewhat point at the bottom.
Then extract or drain over a pan.
Saves a step in the spring, get virtually the same honey. if the comb is wonky cut it all out and clean , and replace the strip.

GG
 
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