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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to beekeeping, and my husband and I finally decided that we want to add bees to our little farm. (I have chickens, turkeys and Quail) I'm excited to get started, and have been reading everything and anything I can to learn. I have been buying local honey for a few years now, to combat my family's allergies, and it has worked so well, it's amazing.

I realize I should start a new hive in the spring, but what about purchasing an established hive (then adding more in the spring)? Can this be done in mid-summer?

Thanks, and I'm glad I found you all!
 

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Welcome!

Depending on location and availability, there are breeders who sell whole hives. Pricey, but they do sell them.
Another more economical option would be to buy a Nucleus hive(Nuc Hive). Which typically consists of 5 frames, opposed to 8 or 10.
You could always buy more at any time really up until late summer, its getting kind of late in the year as of now though.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>I am new to beekeeping, and my husband and I finally decided that we want to add bees to our little farm. (I have chickens, turkeys and Quail)

Wow! You're on Long Island, population 7,740,208... or NYC if you like, population 8,405,837... I live just outside Nehawka, Nebraska, population 204 (according to the 2010 census) and they won't let anyone have chickens or turkeys or quail or anything else they could possibly call livestock... it's great to live in a free country...

I think bees will be a wonderful addition to your farm.
 

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Michael, I spent 4 weeks two years in a row doing Apiary Inspection work on Long Island. I was surprised at how rural many part of the island were and may still be. That was 26 years ago. I also saw hives on rooves of garages, on the second story loft of what had been a buggy shed, and mostly in peoples back yards. I will always remember the Italian/American man who offered me some of his home made wine poured from a one gallon glass jug, made from grapes grown in his back yard. Bellisimo. I think that's the word for it.

There are a couple of apple orchards on Long Island too. There were some apiaries registered on Fire Island. It was too late in the day to ferry out there and back. Darn.
 

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With a population density of 27,778.7 people per sq mile (NYC), it's hard to imagine there would be a free square inch... but I guess Long Island itself is only 5,401.2 people per sq mile. I guess that's only 9 people per acre or so. Within the city limits of Nehawka the density is 887 people per sq mile... which is close to one person per acre... seems like we could put up with a couple of chickens...
 

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Eastern Long Island: My nuc yard (in May)
(eastern is the operative word)

70814NCF3.jpg
Behind hedge row is fallow field and further back a vineyard.

51814NCfarm2.jpg
Standing in front of hives looking east.

51814NCfarm3.jpg
Standing in front of hives looking south.

51814NCfarm4.jpg
Standing in front of hives looking west.

Beyond the tree lines is more of the same.

Production yard: Sewing mixed pasture seed (late August 2013)
Looking South East, hives behind me.

003.jpg

IMAG0021.jpg
same field early spring 2014. Organic chicken farm showing movable chicken tractors.
The certified organic designation of the farm requires that I adhere to the CNG apiary standards
for my hives located here. I have 20 production hives on the farm. One grouping is below so that
the farm customers can view them. Black locust in bloom in early June behind hives.

6714BF6.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank everyone for the great welcome! I'm looking into established hives for now, but in the spring-I'm putting in a couple of new hives.

I'm going to have TONS of questions! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
With a population density of 27,778.7 people per sq mile (NYC), it's hard to imagine there would be a free square inch... but I guess Long Island itself is only 5,401.2 people per sq mile. I guess that's only 9 people per acre or so. Within the city limits of Nehawka the density is 887 people per sq mile... which is close to one person per acre... seems like we could put up with a couple of chickens...
Chickens are what keeps those wonderful, and famous Long Island ticks in control. (that should be our baseball team-The Long Island Ticks not the Ducks.)Long Island is densely populated on the south shore-everyone wants to be near the ocean. The North Shore is far less popular and populated!
I have an acre of property mostly wooded but cleared enough for my chickens, turkeys, vegetables and now my bees. In the summer I can't see my neighbors houses! (and I'm originally from Queens, so not seeing anyone suits me down to the ground.) I've been to Nebraska-Lincoln, my cousin used to teach at the University at Lincoln. I thought it was beautiful. You should, without a doubt, be able to have chickens!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Eastern Long Island: My nuc yard (in May)
(eastern is the operative word)

View attachment 12723
Behind hedge row is fallow field and further back a vineyard.

View attachment 12724
Standing in front of hives looking east.

View attachment 12725
Standing in front of hives looking south.

View attachment 12726
Standing in front of hives looking west.

Beyond the tree lines is more of the same.

Production yard: Sewing mixed pasture seed (late August 2013)
Looking South East, hives behind me.

View attachment 12728

View attachment 12729
same field early spring 2014. Organic chicken farm showing movable chicken tractors.
The certified organic designation of the farm requires that I adhere to the CNG apiary standards
for my hives located here. I have 20 production hives on the farm. One grouping is below so that
the farm customers can view them. Black locust in bloom in early June behind hives.

View attachment 12730
I can't open the pictures :(
 
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