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Good day all!
Just a quick intro in keeping with the forum rules: My name is Josh. I teach environmental studies at a local tech college. I love all things natural and outdoorsy, but venomous snake ecology is my forte. I am still in the research phase of keeping bees because I want my bees (when I do get them) to be super happy and productive. Oh yeah...the bee support in my area is apparently non existant. There is only one bee keeper in my four county area according to Clemson Extension, so I'm going to have to learn this the hard way (reading, asking and trial & error).

So howdy! I look forward to chatting with some of you. You seem to be a very intelligent & laid back group.
 

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earthguy,

Welcome!
I am in the same situation with the Associations. It is an hour to the closest group.
I have the advantage of growing up with bees around and having gone to Clemson and take the Apiculture course and done some grad work there.

I know the Lexington Group is a good size and does a lot of education.
 

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Welcome, I have never been crazy about herpetology, but most people are the same way about apiculture. Even if you read everything, take an apiculture course, and find a mentor - it always comes down to practical experience.
 

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I took classes at NC State in beekeeping. Introductory and Advanced. I thought I would be able to keep bees and they would take off with all my experience. I was wrong. No matter how much you read, there is always a learning curve. Good luck, and welcome!
 

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That is why our workshops are spread over the entire year with lecture, question/answer, practical exercises and personal hives.
I understand. That is exactly how the NC State classes were. Actually broken up exactly in that fashion. Intro was in the fall with Q&A and demonstrations, Advanced in the spring also with constant Q&A and demonstrations. Small classes, with hands on experience. We each got a hive to build, put a package in, and manage. It was very helpful, and got into some advanced stuff (such as the chemical composition of the QMP [queen mandibular pheromone]). We got to graft, do woodworking, solve problems (such as diagnosing a laying worker hive, followed by trying to fix it), manage pests, all the good stuff. We even took the North Carolina Certified Beekeeper's test in the class.

But even beekeepers who have been keeping bees for years get surprised once in a while. You could sit through classes for a decade and still lose a hive. It's the nature of the industry.

I'm not saying your workshops arn't good. I'm sure you learn alot. But no workshop in the world will make you an expert. Some people with 50 years of experience (for example in Dr. Miller's "50 years among the bees") havn't figured everything out.
 

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Welcome to the forum .there is so much to learn about bees just think you kinda have a small understanding of them they just throw you a curve. good luck,there is lot of good info on here
 
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