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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
End of February I checked both my hives and found one queen and in the second box I ended up killing the second queen as I put the second deep on.

Yesterday was the first time in a month that I have been home and warm enough to check my hives.

In the first box where I saw the queen there was no queen nor any brood or larva anywhere in the boxes.

In the second box (where the queen was killed) neither deep had any eggs or larva BUT the med super had some brood, both regular, drone and some queen cell both on the bottom and mid frame. There were three super frames with this and nothing more. These areas were a little larger than hand sized. I had wintered in Houston with no queen excluders but put them on since the first queen was trying to start laying in the honey super.

The question is do you think this was a laying worker or the queen from the first box some how may have taken off and ended up in the second box super and probably died being stuck in the top box during or recent cold spell? Most of the cells were capped but saw no eggs but had some mid sized larva.

The reason for the super was on both as I had too many bees in the fall and needed more room.

Any other ideas other that I need some new queens asap when the come on the market?

Both boxes still have a lot of bees BUT.. what to do till queens are available. Think this was the queen that I saw or ?

Ideas appreciated.

Thanks, Jim
 

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Laying workers can only lay drones, you would not see any capped worker brood. The queen cells can be a bit more deceiving as sometimes, in an act of total desperation, a laying worker hive can try to raise an unfertilized egg in a queen cell. If you are in Houston, I would expect the queen would be laying some eggs this time of year. Perhaps that polar vortex you all had was worse for the bees than expected. If queens are not available and you are sure she isn't there, I'd combine them with another hive to save the bees.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Laying workers can only lay drones, you would not see any capped worker brood. The queen cells can be a bit more deceiving as sometimes, in an act of total desperation, a laying worker hive can try to raise an unfertilized egg in a queen cell. If you are in Houston, I would expect the queen would be laying some eggs this time of year. Perhaps that polar vortex you all had was worse for the bees than expected. If queens are not available and you are sure she isn't there, I'd combine them with another hive to save the bees.

I was surprised with what I saw in the first box there was no brood eggs or anything and the deeps or super.

In the second box the one in which which the queen was killed and found no eggs or anything in the two deeps But I had put queen excluder on in February. BUT There were three or four areas drone brood, normal worker brood And normal looking queen cells on the bottom and super seendures on the frames. I do not see a queen in there but I took the queen excluders out And place the frame with the best looking queen cell over and hI’ve number 1+ I’m hoping that the queen in the super #2 give is now down in the second

I was surprised when I saw what I saw because I thought number one would’ve had a bunch of queen cells since they try to swarm around the middle of March.
All I can hope is that for some reason to clean but to the open box over on a hard number two and that’s why I have normal look at the eggs and brood.
I really hope some people get some queens ready early this year. Jim
 
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