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Discussion Starter #1
Today while watching my hive, one of them swarmed to about 40 feet high on a tree near my apiary. I am too old to even think of going that hive. I would appreciate any recommendations that might help recover the bees. They had one super 1/4 filled bit it is hot and humid today.
Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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Turn your attention to taking care of the bees you have left. Don't inspect now - but when did you last inspect - did you see queen cells? They would have started swarm prep just about two weeks ago. With luck in another week to 10 days you will have a new laying queen.
 

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You can put a hive body out with a few frames in it and a drop of Lemongrass oil, and hope the scout bees locate it and decide to move the swarm in. Remote likelihood at best...but worth a shot. Better than doing nothing... Kind of like playing the lottery...you probably won't win, but you can't win if you don't play. ;)
 

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Not to sound to obvious but you should set out a nuc or hive close to where they are. If they do move in then you can screen or block them in and move them to where you would like them to stay. Some people use grass to block the entrance and make the bees re-orientate to their new placement.

As Andrew said, keep an eye on the hive that swarmed and make sure in a couple weeks you have a good queen.

Good luck!
 

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I suggest this once before, but I don't believe it was tried.

From "How-To...' - "Bring down high swarms" (Taylor)

"(Raise a frame of unsealed brood)"...

Fling a weighted string over the branch (over the cluster spot). ('Got a sling shot? - a lug nut makes a nice weight)
Attach a heavier cord and pull back over.
Tie on an old hand bag or straw basket.
Place unsealed brood frame inside & pull up to the swarm cluster.
Wait an hour or two for the swarm to engulf the frame/bag.
Lower the swarm.

It's what I'll try, next time I'm in that situation.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I looked very carefully at the swarm in the tree. They are scattered along the trunk which is quit narrow. I treasure my arms, legs and head so i am not doing any climbing at my age.These suggestions are very helpful and I placed a deep with frames and some comb nearby and splattered them with sugar water and honey bee healthy but it is only about 6" off the ground... Best I could do. I first noticed one of my hives with numerous bees like in flight like orientation. I thought perhaps it was being robbed so i used a entrance reducer and then I noticed the swarm in the tree nearby. I am not expert enough but perhaps a swarm from another area tried to rob my hive or use it and then moved on to an adjacent tree.Anyway thanks for the advice. The bees do what they need to do and I am always fascinated.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Turn your attention to taking care of the bees you have left. Don't inspect now - but when did you last inspect - did you see queen cells? They would have started swarm prep just about two weeks ago. With luck in another week to 10 days you will have a new laying queen.
Andrew
That is very encouraging.
Thanks
 

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I was going to suggest the 00 Buckshot method, but that only works if they are out on a limb. I think you might need a bigger round if they are on the trunk..... Good luck with the Hive Body and LG trap, hope they come home, but like Andrew said, if not you still have the other hive, hope she gets mated. Good Luck. Keep us posted. G :popcorn:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here is an update. I just checked the swarm.It is about 3.5 hours later. They are gone. They are not in my trap and I do know there are bees in the hive but I do not want to disturb it at this time. Do swarms move with that level of frequency. I hope they returned to the hive but that may be hopeful thinking. I am a hunter so i have shotguns but I am better with pheasants than trees so I did not use that method but a great idea.
 

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Swarms are issued from the hive, it has been my experience they land fairly close at first, then scout bees go out seeking a new spot to call home. Unfortunately, it wasn't your box... They could be in a neighbors soffit, or somewhere a few miles away. Bees are bees, and will do as they please! Leave that trap out...you never know. You are wise not going into the swarmed hive...give them a few weeks to requeen and rebuild. Sorry you didn't get them, but be happy for your bees. They were happy and strong enough to reproduce! Think about it this way...your hive just gave birth to a new colony. ;)
 
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