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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I pulled some frames early this spring that were already mostly empty. I’ve had them out away from the apiary but letting the bees collect what little bits of nectar were left. They’ve been taking their time about it, so it’s been a month or two.

was checking today and found a webbed cell. Pulled the webbing off and revealed this thing. Any ideas what it is? It’s bigger than what I thought a wax moth would get to be.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The good news is I plan to render the wax for candles. I guess I’ll throw the frames in the freezer for a few days!

Thanks for the help!
 

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I agree with the fishing bait comment. Thumbs up. Make lemonade out of lemons.

Those little buggers will mess up your comb faster than you believe. If you see those get rid of all of them fast. You better also check that whole box and every frame with it to make sure there aren't others. They are very prolific and once they are in the box, they seem to multiply quite fast.

If the bees have too much territory, more than they can cover in a box is when they will especially become a mess. You'll see the bees acting funny in a box also that's dominated by them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I’ve been doing bi weekly hive checks. Will keep a close eye on it in the apiary for sure. Haven’t seen any webbing in with the bees yet. Just in these that I had pulled out.

weird that there was only one. <head scratch>
 

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7 Hives of Apis mellifera with some Africanization
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Wax moth larva, especially the lesser, they can infiltrate deep inside the comb. If they do, you'll see patches of brood that look like they're emerging, en mass, when close examination will reveal they are trapped/entombed in their cells by wax moth larval webbing. If you notice a patch of brood that should be capped, but isn't, where the cappings are malformed and primarily open with malformed wavy edges. If you carefully probe, one of these areas, you will often discover a hidden wax moth larva to be responsible. They will suddenly attempt to flee when disturbed. Otherwise they stay well hidden. This is why I use Bt Aizawai powder, to suppress them. It really helps me to keep the wax moths under control.
 
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