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Too much time spent in a colony obviously that new, often results in the queen being killed by workers who blame her for your intrusions. It is tempting and the bees are not defensive, but after seeing the brood, you have no more to learn. Fill the feeder and get out is my best advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
what did you need identified?
Sorry for lack of what I was asking for. This is my second time in 3 yrs as a hobbyist, my first was a little learning lesson but it seemed the more I tried learning the more complicated it was. I wish I had a mentor in my area to work with.
But I don't know what I am looking at when I look at the frames. And was hoping to get a little insight from the more experienced as to what they see, and I realize the photographer didn't do a good job. Apologies in advance.
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We see lots of bees and open brood.
That's about it.

You kinda need to be deliberate and purposeful and have some objective when looking at bees.
Otherwise, why bother looking at them.
So what is you objective when looking at bees?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
We see lots of bees and open brood.
That's about it.

You kinda need to be deliberate and purposeful and have some objective when looking at bees.
Otherwise, why bother looking at them.
So what is you objective when looking at bees?
To try and see or put in prospective what I have read or learned.
 

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everything looks good to me.

Before you start an inspection decide what the purpose of the inspection is and that will help guide you what to look for.

When I am inspecting a hive I am looking for some combination of the following things:
  • swarm cells to indicate a hive is trying to swarm and that I need to find the queen and split it
  • eggs and/or young larve to indicate the presence of a laying queen
  • capped worker brood to indicate the queen is laying right
  • amount of free/empty space to indicate if I need to add a new super
  • capped drone cells to indicate if it is to early in the season to split or not
  • general hive population (low, normal, lot, ect) to indicate any problems
  • mite counts (I use a sugar roll) to check loads and if I need to treat
  • spotty capped frames (usually indicates high might load for me)
  • stores in the fall to decide if I need to feed them for winter or not
There may be other things at times, but this is most of the things I look for during an inspection. I am not looking for all of these items at any one inspection, but am usually looking for a few. I usually don't pull all of the frames, and pull just enough to find eggs/larve. I tip up most of the boxes in the brood chamber to look for swarm cells.
 

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I wish I had a mentor in my area to work with.
What part of the world are you in? It is usually most helpful to put your location in your profile, because beekeeping is very different from one climate to another. You will get the best advice when people can hover over your flag in the info pane and see where you are.

<----Try it, hover over my flag. Or, I suppose, if you are on your phone, you will have to click on my picture.

Oh, and Welcome to Beesource.
 

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I would contact these folks and see if anyone is near you. It is the busy part of the year for beekeepers but I bet you could find someone to mentor you or at least give some advice.


And:

. Welcome to MCBA’s Online Membership Management Portal. The purpose of the MCBA is to promote good beekeeping in Madison County, train and assist anyone interested in getting into the hobby or business and inspire members to maintain a high quality of bee products sold from the County.

The Madison County Beekeepers Association meets on the second Thursday of every odd numbered month (Jan, Mar. May, July etc.) at 6:30 PM. More here about our Monthly Meetings Meeting location is the Huntsville Botanical Garden (shows a map) which is located at 4747 Bob Wallace Avenue in Huntsville Al.
Email us at: [email protected] for club questions or any questions about bees or beekeeping.

And:
 

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ok then I see brood in uncapped stage on "new" comb
new IE white wax, as we age brood cells they get darker.
as brood ages it gets capped. egg for 3 days Larvae for 5 ish days, capped cocconing to an insect for 13 days ish , then hatch.

overall "normal"

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ok then I see brood in uncapped stage on "new" comb
new IE white wax, as we age brood cells they get darker.
as brood ages it gets capped. egg for 3 days Larvae for 5 ish days, capped cocconing to an insect for 13 days ish , then hatch.

overall "normal"

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you, that's not queen cells on the one frame. I was thinking it could have been, but I guess it wasn't mentioned so I guess it wasn't
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you, that's not queen cells on the one frame. I was thinking it could have been, but I guess it wasn't mentioned so I guess it wasn't
Could you look back if you would and tell me what the darker cells are that are on some of the outermost of the frames
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Okay I open my hived up today for a visual of progress still not knowing much I would like to upload some frames and see what the public thinks
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The bees circled are drones (male bees). You can identify them easily as their eyes are 90% eye balls and they're really big.
 
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