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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At the suggestion of a nother member here, I've retitled my post in hopes of getting more assistance.

I have some questions pertaining to the order of the hives right now. Currently our hive has a new queen installed (we had to order the hive didn’t produce one) . During the absence of a queen, the bees filled the bottom brood chamber almost entirely with pollen and some nectar. The upper brood box became a honey store.. it’s almost entirely full of honey at this point. I understand that positioning inside the hive is important and you can wreck them if you mess with it too much. So, my question is, what are the bees going to do for space for the queen to lay? They’ve filled the bottom with pollen, the top with honey, and there is little space available for laying eggs. When we installed the queen, I did follow my gut and remove one frame of drawn comb that was full of pollen, and put that in the freezer. I replaced it with a single foundation frame. When we checked 3 days later to ensure the queen was released; they were drawing out the foundation but it wasn’t complete yet.

My current arrangement is :
bottom board,
10 frame deep with nine frames in it.,
10 frame deep with 10 frames in it,
10 frame shallow with drawn comb in it that I just put on a week ago but they’ve started to fill with honey,
extra ventilation rig,
top board, and
outer cover.


When I go in next week to check for eggs and larva, should I:

Remove some of the honey from the upper brood box.
Remove pollen frames from the bottom brood box, if so how many? 2-3?
Install foundation in the bottom brood to replace removed frames
Install pollen frames in the upper brood box in place of removed honey?


My concern at this point, and what I’m trying to fix is the lack of available laying space. However if the girls will rearrange all of this and fix it on their own, then I have nothing to worry about and nothing to bother with.

thanks for your thoughts.
 

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You have nothing to worry about. All that pollen will become protein to feed the nurse bees to feed the brood and for the attendants to feed the queen. The nectar will be used to feed all the new activity. What you have is very close to ideal for raising young bees. When you become interested in queen rearing, you will wish for a hive like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Americas,

I was on Active duty when I got here.. after my first tour in Iraq, I got out and became a contractor for the Marines...
I still deploy with them, just not in cammies. We live in town right now but we are building out near temples point. (Down 101 about 10 miles)
 

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I believe some members would suggest that everthing is not fine. Perhaps someone else will jump in to give you, yet, another opinion.

To me you risk to have the queen "honey bound". IMO you need to open the brood nest.
 

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Now I am new and just started in spring of 09 but to me you sound honey bound and need to open up the brood chamber. Also put the 10th frame in the bottom too. But I would replace some full frames with empty frames, no foundation or anything. Micheal Bush talks about openeing up the brood's nest here http://www.bushfarms.com/beesexperiment.htm. Scroll down and read the part on opening up the brood nest and you will be fine. No place to lay eggs is not good IMHO.
 
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