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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to beekeeping this summer as a hobby, I only had one box/hive and I'm not yet concerned with honey production. I simply enjoy the idea of having them around, and helping out the pollinators. So the survival of any hive is all I am concerned about, even if it is severely stunted etc. Anyhow, someone dumped the hive, broke the box, and stole the frames from it two days ago... below is my current situation, and I would greatly appreciate any advice, however, not to be rude but I am not quite interested in hearing that its entirely doomed and I'm wasting my time yet. So spare the keystrokes for me on that :p:cool:

-This happened 2 days ago, Monday the 13th, in the middle of the afternoon sometime, likely around 4pm. The base for my box was a spool with about a 6" diameter cylinder through the middle vertically, with 2" openings on each side. I set up a wooden box over it with a 1" hole drilled in to make it through the night, as there were a lot of worker bees confused and still coming home to rest there, and rain/storms were predicted. Luckily we just got a light sprinkling.
-Then yesterday, tuesday the 14th, I was able to pick up a new hive box and got that set up about 5ft away from the makeshift spool thing in the evening around the time bees would be winding down for the night. The new box is the only one that I am providing food to now, and I have lured some into it with some of the honey/comb I had scraped off the lid during previous inspections.
-So far I have not spotted a queen or any drones to my knowledge. But the bees seem to be guarding that cylinder opening on the spool fairly intently, so I'm holding out the slightest bit of hope that perhaps shes in there. Or perhaps it is my understanding that its possible a new queen could be hatched to replace the one that was taken?

I am working with a langstroth 10 frame box by the way as well.

I will be adding pictures to this post shortly, I apologize for not having them yet but I'm in panic mode over this.

thank you everyone!
 

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Place your new hive right next to the spool and shake or brush the bees off of the spool into the box or at least in front of it. Move the spool as far away as possible.
Any chance you are in bear country ? J
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nope no bears here. Any thoughts on the possibility of the hive reviving without a queen? Assuming shes gone.
 

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In order for that to be possible, they need eggs or young larvae to make a new queen. If all the frames are gone, odds are zero. J
 

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If they are clustered and guarding around that spool, there is a decent chance the queen is there. You need to get her in the box for the colony to locate there. Ideally, physically put her there. Alternatively, allow her an easy way to crawl into it. J
 

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place the hive box on 3/8 or 1/2 by 1 inch sticks on 3 sides, IE use the spool for the bottom board.
Hopefully she crawls up and in. leave one end open for the entrance.
IF they build a bit of comb in the spool , it may be a more difficult thing to deal with.

running deer or something could have knocked it over high wind even.

If you get her back in the box you should be ok

GG
 

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running deer or something could have knocked it over high wind even.

If you get her back in the box you should be ok

GG
It is unlikely that deer would also take all the frames out and away... The problem is that even if you fix it and they survive, the same creatures may come back and destroy/steal it again... I assume they were after free honey, why else anyone would take just frames...
 

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Dekster, the comb is more valuable than honey to a beekeeper. I always first suspect bears because they often take the frames pretty far from the apiary. But usually you see a trail of smashed up ones along the way.
My second suspect if frames are taken is a beekeeper. Anyone else would be too scared. J
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I do actually know who did it unfortunately. Pathetic temper tantrum.. I got there to see him drive away, and I've got trail cams set up. Sad as hell to see a bunch of confused bees..
 

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well it is time for a call to the Sheriff then.
this somewhat changes things.

Seems if you knew it was human damage then that fact may have helped with advise....

So can you determine if honey frames were taken or the brood frames, honey can be fed back, VIA Syrup.
So then you will need some frames as well.

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Everything was taken.. no frames left. But it was taken very sloppily and in the middle of the day, which I assume is bad for them..

I think I have a plan to set the spool on top of the new box, blocking the top end of the spool and opening the hole in the top of the new hive. That should force them into the new hive, or at least through it to get out.

What time if the day is best to do something like this?
 

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If it's a bear, it's coming back, if it's a human and the stunt is not dealt with, it's coming back. It's very hot here in mid-TN. While not ideal, capped brood might still be viable unless the frames have been totally destroyed. If you have pics then call the police, follow them to the person's house and get what is left.

If you have a angry neighbor who has been stung 43 times over the last month, go apologize and ask for your stuff back. If communication is not possible, desired, etc. and you are just trying to recover them long enough to move them, then follow advice from other folks here and make it so they can climb in the box. I agree if they have built comb, and you can't get to this comb to cut it out, then it is trickier. But as long as there are no eggs laid in the new comb they will abandon it if you make them a better offer.

You could buy/introduce a mated queen if she is not there, but your workforce is aging and it would take a lot of TLC.
 
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