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Which book to read?

  • Increase Essentials

    Votes: 7 46.7%
  • Queen Rearing Essentials

    Votes: 3 20.0%
  • Observation Hives

    Votes: 1 6.7%
  • Other (please specify)

    Votes: 4 26.7%
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a reader, and I like to absorb as much information as possible. I read as much of this (as well as other) forums have to offer, as well as Mr. Bush's site (thank you so much for the information). But from time to time I'm not near a computer (weird, isn't it?) and would like a book that I can read. I've already read a few, including the Hive and the Honeybee. I think I've narrowed it down to three books (although I'm open to others):

1. Increase Essentials by Dr. Lawrence John Connor

- From what I've heard, a great book about increasing hive numbers, something I'm very interested in doing. I've moved from 1 to 8 to 0 to 3 to 8 again hives over the past six years. I'm interested in having a few more, and at some point selling nucs (although not for years).

2. Queen Rearing Essentials by Dr. Lawrence John Connor

- Once I have hive numbers to support it, I would like to start rearing my own queens. Not for sale, just so I don't have to buy them myself. I know it's a long learning curve, so I'd like to get on it now, so I hopefully have it within the next 5 years or so. I hate having to rely on swarm cells and emergency cells, and the poor quality queens that emergency cells tend to produce.

3. Observation Hives by Webster/Caron

- One of my favorite activities is watching my 3 deep Observation Hive at home. It usually can't make it through the year as a self sustaining hive though, as it's a boom or bust kinda thing. They either do so well that I need to move them out before they swarm, or they do so poorly I need to boost their numbers every two or three weeks. I'd like to read about sustaining the OH though, as well as simple experiments to do with them.


All three are available through Brushy Mountain Bee Company. That isn't a requirement, but I do have to be able to order it from somewhere, the book stores around me look at me odd when I ask about beekeeping books. Ideally I'd like to order all three, but finances are too tight for that right now.

So what do you think?
 

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I always recommend people to first learn about bee biology and bee behavior

"At the Hive Entrance" by H Storch. One of the best bee behavior identification manuals I have ever read.

I am a fan of the 1922 edition of "Langstroth on the Hive and the Honey Bee", edited by Mr Dadant as well. Very good introduction to bee biology.

Big Bear
 

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I just got a box of Bee Books from a friend of mine. Here are some of the titles:
Hanson's Beekeeping for Fun and Profit
Frank C. Pellett's Hiastory of American Beekeeping
Dr. C.C. Miller's A Thousand answers to Beekeeping Questions
AI and ER Roots The ABC and XYZ of Bee Culture (1917 edition)
ditto (1959 edition)
AI Roots The ABC of Bee Culture(1903 edition)
AI Roots The ABC and XYZ of Bee Culture(1929 edition)
ditto the 1908 edition
ditto the 1919 edition
Frank C. Pellett's American Honey Plants (two editions 1920 and 1930)
CC Miller's 40 Years Among the Bees
CC Miller's Fifty Years Among the Bees
Langstroth on the Hive and the Honey-Bee (1914 edition)
ditto revised by Chas. Dadant and Son (1889 edition)
ditto (1918 edition)
Brother Adam's In Search of the Best Strains of Bees (two copies)
USDA 1952 The Yearbook of Agriculture INSECTS w/ 4 articles about bees and pollination.
Numerous pamphlets.

Now, if I can only get through all the ones I already had. Imagine what I would know.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I always recommend people to first learn about bee biology and bee behavior

"At the Hive Entrance" by H Storch. One of the best bee behavior identification manuals I have ever read.

I am a fan of the 1922 edition of "Langstroth on the Hive and the Honey Bee", edited by Mr Dadant as well. Very good introduction to bee biology.

Big Bear
Thanks for the advice Big Bear.

I think I should be clear that these aren't my first beekeeping books, by far. I've studied entomology (although it wasn't my major) at NC State under Dr. Ambrose and Dr. Tarpy, taking up to the Advanced Beekeeping class. I'm also a certified NC State beekeeper.

Not saying that your book advice was "basic" or anything, but I do have a thorough understanding of bee biology.

I will still look into the book though, as you can always have input from a different source.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just got a box of Bee Books from a friend of mine. Here are some of the titles:
Hanson's Beekeeping for Fun and Profit
Frank C. Pellett's Hiastory of American Beekeeping
Dr. C.C. Miller's A Thousand answers to Beekeeping Questions
AI and ER Roots The ABC and XYZ of Bee Culture (1917 edition)
ditto (1959 edition)
AI Roots The ABC of Bee Culture(1903 edition)
AI Roots The ABC and XYZ of Bee Culture(1929 edition)
ditto the 1908 edition
ditto the 1919 edition
Frank C. Pellett's American Honey Plants (two editions 1920 and 1930)
CC Miller's 40 Years Among the Bees
CC Miller's Fifty Years Among the Bees
Langstroth on the Hive and the Honey-Bee (1914 edition)
ditto revised by Chas. Dadant and Son (1889 edition)
ditto (1918 edition)
Brother Adam's In Search of the Best Strains of Bees (two copies)
USDA 1952 The Yearbook of Agriculture INSECTS w/ 4 articles about bees and pollination.
Numerous pamphlets.

Now, if I can only get through all the ones I already had. Imagine what I would know.
Amazing! I would kill for some of those books, especially any of Dr. Miller's, ABC and XYZ, or late 19th century Hive and the Honey-Bee books.
 

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Originally Posted by sqkcrk
I just got a box of Bee Books from a friend of mine.

That's quite a nice find.
I hope you gave them a jar of honey...

The illustrations are great in the old Root "ABC" books. I bought a 1905 copy for $5.00 a few years ago. I'm jealous, I only have three ABC books.

Part of my collection are all of the Snellgrove books.
 

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Amazing! I would kill for some of those books, especially any of Dr. Miller's, ABC and XYZ, or late 19th century Hive and the Honey-Bee books.

I'll ask my friend if he minds if I share them w/ you. He said that he wanted me to have them. He didn't say what he expected me to do w/ them. I already have some of these.

How about "Plan bee" by Susan Brackney? I got distracted from it on page 29. I must have gotten busy w/ my own plan bee.

I have another three and a half feet of shelf space of bee books that I didn't list. I should probably do something about cataloging them.
 

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Not saying that your book advice was "basic" or anything, but I do have a thorough understanding of bee biology.
Sorry, wasn't intending to make it sound 'beginner-ish' I just happen to think those are two very good books for anyone.

Big Bear
 

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Originally Posted by sqkcrk
I just got a box of Bee Books from a friend of mine.

That's quite a nice find.
I hope you gave them a jar of honey...
Well, I did take his wife a jar of honey since the only honey he produces now is comb honey and not liquid. Taking him honey would be sorta funny, since he used to have 1800 hives and has extracted tons of my honey over the years.

I buy mini frame comb honey from him and he knows that if he ever needs bottled honey he can get it from me. He buys nucs from me too. And loves them.

He has an antique uncapping defvice that he wanted me to have, but he wanted to show me how it works first, but couldn't get it out of it's crate.

How about " " by Kit Williams? That's the title. " " Subtitled: I have words to offer wisdom and pictures to delight, A story of a tragic Queen and a fearless knight. But my name remains a secret it's hidden here within, if you can but find it more treasure you might win. A most unusaual illustrated book.
 

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i've read all three of Lawrence Conners books in the last month. i would recomend increase essentials, i think i got the most out of that one. Queen rearing essentials is also a good one, after increase. very informative, i think it will help take you to another level of beekeeping. good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'll ask my friend if he minds if I share them w/ you. He said that he wanted me to have them. He didn't say what he expected me to do w/ them. I already have some of these.
That would be fantastic! But make sure you ask first, I would hate to step on toes.

How about "Plan bee" by Susan Brackney? I got distracted from it on page 29. I must have gotten busy w/ my own plan bee.
I haven't heard of it, but will get to checking up on it . . . if you think it's worth getting past page 29 . . .

Sorry, wasn't intending to make it sound 'beginner-ish' I just happen to think those are two very good books for anyone.

Big Bear
Taken into consideration. I may end up cracking them open, I could always take a good book.

How about " " by Kit Williams? That's the title. " " Subtitled: I have words to offer wisdom and pictures to delight, A story of a tragic Queen and a fearless knight. But my name remains a secret it's hidden here within, if you can but find it more treasure you might win. A most unusaual illustrated book.
Haha, just hilarious.

i've read all three of Lawrence Conners books in the last month. i would recomend increase essentials, i think i got the most out of that one. Queen rearing essentials is also a good one, after increase. very informative, i think it will help take you to another level of beekeeping. good luck.
Increase Essentials appears to be taking the lead in the polls, so I might go with that. I'm kinda torn, because I would need more hives to justify a bigger queen rearing operation. However, with more hives I would need more queens. It's kinda like I need the one to get the other, and I need the other to get the one. A chicken and the egg scenario.

But if you think Increase Essentials might be better, I may go with that. Thanks for the advice everyone! Great help!
 

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i've read all three of Lawrence Conners books in the last month.
Did you run across any typos?

I have Conner's book on queens and I've read Increase Essentials...

I wish he would spellcheck his text before printing the books. The techniques are more important than the spelling, but it bothers me when a book is peppered with errors.
 

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Agree with NasalSponge. ANYTHING by Richard Taylor is worth reading again and again.

"The How to do it Book of Beekeeping" is not really a beginner book. The title only makes it sound that way. His short bit on "how to stun an audience" is hilarious. Lots and lots of common sense stuff on requeening, rearing queens, any topic you can think of. There are two editions, a 1977 and one a few years earlier. The 1977 edition has more in it. Either is worth having.

Unless you want to spend big bucks, you have to settle for a well-worn copy, or get real lucky at Goodwill or something. All the online used book sites are expensive.
 

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I haven't heard of it, but will get to checking up on it . . . if you think it's worth getting past page 29 . . .


Haha, just hilarious.
I'm not a good reader. I'm more of a tv and movie sort of consumer. So, you might get something out of it that I don't.

That book I mentioned " ", is a real book. I couldn't make it up if I tried. It was published in England, I believe, and the author is an artist that does this sort of thing because he is an artist, I guess. Anyway, there was a contest, a challenge, that if, by reading the book and figuring out the clues, you could figure out what the name of the book was and end up w/ a nice prize, the only copy of the book w/ it's title printed on it and the gold queen bee that gaurds the prize that is inside of a beautiful marquetry inlaid mahogony box. Published in 1984.
 

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Did you run across any typos?

I have Conner's book on queens and I've read Increase Essentials...

I wish he would spellcheck his text before printing the books. The techniques are more important than the spelling, but it bothers me when a book is peppered with errors.
Not just spell checking, he needs a proof-reader. His books have great content, but the typos, grammatical errors and butchered sentences are distracting. Sometimes I'd read a sentence several times, unable to figure out if it was missing punctuation, words, or was just mangled beyond recognition.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
That book I mentioned " ", is a real book. I couldn't make it up if I tried. It was published in England, I believe, and the author is an artist that does this sort of thing because he is an artist, I guess. Anyway, there was a contest, a challenge, that if, by reading the book and figuring out the clues, you could figure out what the name of the book was and end up w/ a nice prize, the only copy of the book w/ it's title printed on it and the gold queen bee that gaurds the prize that is inside of a beautiful marquetry inlaid mahogony box. Published in 1984.
Do you know if anyone claimed the prize?
 

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I don't. After a period of time, according to the back cover, the author would reveal the name and the contents of the box which held the titled book. This was printed in 1985, so I've lost track of what happened. I bet it's on the net somewhere.

Look up Kit Williams on the net and you will get a good idea of this guys work. It's quite fun, if you enjoy difficult puzzles and mysteries. The book isn't a mystery, the name of the book is a mystery. And the mystery continues, because it isn't even revealed on the web site after all these years.

Look it up. You'll enjoy the fun of it.
 
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