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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in South Texas. Temp is currently 82, but its raining.*

I did a cutout 3 weeks ago, and the bees seemed fine. Put them in a TBH Nuc. Fed for a couple days

I just got back from a trip and every bee is dead except the queen. I dont know when she last ate.*

Should I just put some capped brood and honey bars from other hives and put in hive with her?

Should I keep her caged in the queen catcher for a day or two?

What are the necessary resources - how many bars of brood, honey, pollen??

Is this a today emergency even in the rain, or should I wait to open other hives untill it stops raining?*

If wait, say till tomorrow, do I just keep her in the queen clip in my house, or in the empty TBH with no bees? How warm does she need to be kept?

Never been in this situation.*

Thanks!!

TxBeek
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I put 2 bars of partially capped honey and two bars of some capped brood, some pollen, and some honey. And all the nurse bees and workers on the bars. Put the queen clip under the first bar which is empty. The bees immediately went to her cage and many others started fanning. Don't know if they went to kill her or feed her. Guess I will know tomorrow.

Thanks for the replies. Will post the results.

TxBeek
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How does this happen?
I used some galvanized hardware cloth bent in a L shape along the edge of the top bar to hold the cutout comb close to the bar so the bees could reattach. I'm wondering if the workers died of zinc poisoning or something else from the galvanization. It was recycled rat cage wire that was somewhat rusty.

None is now in the hive with the queen or new bees.

Anyone want some dead bees for an autopsy to determine why they died? ;)

TxBeek
 

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I used some galvanized hardware cloth bent in a L shape along the edge of the top bar to hold the cutout comb close to the bar so the bees could reattach. I'm wondering if the workers died of zinc poisoning or something else from the galvanization. It was recycled rat cage wire that was somewhat rusty.

None is now in the hive with the queen or new bees.

Anyone want some dead bees for an autopsy to determine why they died? ;)

TxBeek
I'm rather puzzled at how something can manage to kill off all of the bees, but not the queen, when often the queen is among the first casualties. Must of been some rather acute poisoning for it to kill the workers before they can contaminate the queen!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm not sure that was it. It did rain off and on for several days, and the temp dipped into the high 30s. They were used to an insulated wall in a house, so may not have been prepared for the cold snap. I also put a small ziplock bag of sugar syrup in the back of the hive before I left. I also left 4 full quart bags in the area for all the hives. But my strong hives may have robbed them out and killed the workers but left the queen who hid under some cutout honey comb i left in the back of the hive. Or it may have been a combination of everything. I've only been doing this for less than a year. So my learning curve is still very steep. All I can do is speculate till someone tests my dead bees for toxins.

Any takers??

TxBeek
 

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Sorry to hear about your bees, txbeek. If you want them tested you might want to check with your Department of Agriculture. I think some do that sort of testing but there may be a fee.

Good luck with your queen!

Regards,
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I dont have a queen cage, so i used a queen clip to keep track of her while i cleaned out the hive, and moved top bars.

But I guess I got lucky. I just went out there tonight and she was alive, so I released her. I guess the transferred bees accepted her.

TxBeek
 
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