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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I called an exterminator to treat for ants in a rental house. He and I got to talking about bees. I asked him to call me if he saw a swarm. (I got my last swarm from an exterminator's lead). He said he would, but I should talk to his boss and get the swarms from the whole company. I did.

I was thinking about swarms in trees or bushes. He said can you get the bees out of a house or building. This is where I ran my mouth too much. I said "sure, no problem". Problem: I have never done one. I am building the equipment for a trap out now, using an adaptation of Cleo Hogans plans. Will a 5 frame nuc be a big enough box?

Fortunately my mentor has agreed to help me, so I won't have to go in totally blind.
 

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Be sure to argue with any of the responders that offer advice! :lpf:


Just a bit of friendly advice: If the bees are now in a structure, "swarm" is probably a bit dated. Almost certainly they have comb at this point and "colony" might be a better term. :)

Keep in mind that a trapout is not a quick solution to bees in a structure. Depending on the anxiety level of the structure owner, a cutout may be more in line with what they have in mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I called an exterminator to treat for ants in a rental house. He and I got to talking about bees. I asked him to call me if he saw a swarm. (I got my last swarm from an exterminator's lead). He said he would, but I should talk to his boss and get the swarms from the whole company. I did.

I was thinking about swarms in trees or bushes. He said can you get the bees out of a house or building. This is where I ran my mouth too much. I said "sure, no problem". Problem: I have never done one. I am building the equipment for a trap out now, using an adaptation of Cleo Hogans plans. Will a 5 frame nuc be a big enough box?

Fortunately my mentor has agreed to help me, so I won't have to go in totally blind.
I think in most cases a cut-out would be best, but what about a tree cavity or a brick/concrete block structure?

Will a nuc box be enough in most cases?
 

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In my experience the biggest problem doing a trapout is people...
+ 1:thumbsup:
In most case yes, but it my experience it depends on how frequent you want to visit, time of year, and size of colony. But I have only done two trapouts, and always suggest cutouts when feasible between the two.
 

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From what I read on the forums, if people are calling for removals, trap outs are the worst way to go, especially for established colonies. They might do the job for structures you can't cut into, but I'm betting most will require a cutout to remove all the old comb/honey/brood etc... so they don't end up with a big stinky mess later.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was mostly thinking of trapouts in places where a cut-out is not feasible. I explained that in a cut-out either he or the owner would have to provide a craftsman to do the tear out and build back. That is above my pay-grade.
 

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Problem: I have never done one. I am building the equipment for a trap out now, using an adaptation of Cleo Hogans plans. Will a 5 frame nuc be a big enough box?

Fortunately my mentor has agreed to help me, so I won't have to go in totally blind.
In most situations a nuc box is large enough, providing you remove it when it is full and put another nuc in its place with a frame of eggs. Using a full hive will give them more room, but can be really heavy and awkward to get down from a ladder etc when it is full of bees.
If you have some experience with construction then you can probably do cut outs. Doing them require the correct tools and equipment, and cut outs take TIME.. From four hours to two days, depending on where the bees have chosen to build.
Use better judgement when your LOOKING at a potential job. Popping off an eave and removing bees is not the same as cutting through a brick wall to access the hive. PRICE the job accordingly.. If it is going to be a long hard job, CHARGE according to that difficulty.
Lastly.. ALWAYS make sure the owner understands what you are about to destroy to get those bees gone.
 

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Will a nuc box be enough in most cases?
It will be large enough if you move the bees away each time you get 3 to 5 pounds of bees in the nuc. If you are going to do an elimination trapout, and the tree has 15 pounds of bees, they won't fit in a five frame nuc. You can add chambers to the nuc, but, I would suggest moving frames when you have 3 to 5 frames full of bees. That helps to deplete the colony faster. If you don't want the additional colonies, sell them, or recombine all of them later.

Trapouts, typically take at least 6 weeks to finish. Plan on two months for total elimination.

cchoganjr
 

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Trap outs are a great method to eliminate colonies from structures that you are unable to access. But as Cleo mentioned, the process takes months to complete correctly. I think if you were to start a trap out this time of year in NC there would not be enough time to complete the project.

Remember, at the end of the trap out period your goal is to have a colony in the wall that is so weakened that it will be easily robbed out and decimated. The final step is to allow the trapped out colony to rob out all of the stores in the wall or structure so there is no honey left behind before sealing it up. If you started now that puts your robbing period in the middle of winter when all the bees will be clustered. The timing right now doesn't work out. The removal would have to be a cut out if they need the bees removed now in a timely manner
 
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