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After finding mites in my hives a month ago, I treated all four of my hives for varroa, with hopguard 2. One hive, my most successful bustling colony, completely absconded. Now I have the three others with very spotty brood, and chewed down brood. I have also seen deformed wings. They look much worse than they did when I first opened the hives for treatment. We are getting ready for winter here, and it is supposed to be 19 degrees tomorrow night. I went in to do my final inspections and wrap my hives for winter today, only to find this very sad situation. I obviously don’t want to lose these colonies. What can I do?
These are each two deep hive bodies, and all supers have been removed.
I had thought I would go ahead and bring everyone into a single brood box and wrap. Any advice deeply appreciated.
Thanks
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Hi Snowbee. Welcome to Beesource. Please take a moment to update your profile to include location and beekeeping experience. Chances are good that you waited too long to begin treatment. Most treatment programs need to begin in August in order for the hive to be relatively mite free for at least one or two brood cycles.
 

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If the population is not large enough for them maintain 2 deeps, then I would reduce them to a single with food stores. If ur location dictates overwintering in more than a single, u may want to consider combining hives. I would also make sure that I was queen right.

I would immediately begin treating with oxalic acid vaporization if they were my hives. Every 3 days for at least 5 cycles.
 

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Thanks a million to both of you. I will bear in mind your great suggestions... and yes, complete my profile. This is my third year beeking, and I have never had this problem with mites... but I absolutely should have seen it coming. Two original packages are probably lost. I am devastated.... quite a loss, but important lessons learned. Going to see if I can try to treat, feed and bring them through anyway.
Will definitely treat in the spring, and carry out super vigilant mite checks in July, and treat again in early August next year, for SURE.
Thanks again.
 

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I don't know about hopguard 2, but the user reviews for the first hopguard are overwhelmingly negative.

Likely your issues are caused from two factors. One, not treating early enough, and two, using a less than excellent treatment.

Although the video posted by MSL looks excellent I didn't take the 20 minutes to watch it so not sure what it covered. But just incase it wasn't mentioned, once a hive reaches a certain stage of mite damage, it is beyond saving, even if all mites were killed immediately. That is because of the adult bees being damaged and having their lifespans shortened, and the brood being nearly 100% infected. The 3 week brood cycle means the amount of time needed to start getting healthy bees through is too long, in a failing hive.

In your case, you are still seeing signs of mite damage after the treatment, in other words, the treatment did not do the job.

A very reliable treatment is Apivar strips. For hives such as yours, if you are going to try to save them, Apivar strips are a good option. However I don't know how much time is left in your season for the bees to get more un mite damaged bees raised, or if your hives are beyond saving anyhow. But if you want to give it a shot, Apivar strips are a good choice.

One thing about use of Apivar in badly affected hives, the strips should be placed mid brood. However for the first 3 weeks of treatment the hive will continue to decline, and the brood nest may move away from the strips. So at the three week mark the hive should be opened again, and if the brood nest has shrunk and been moved, the strips should also be moved, to the new centre of the brood nest. If the hive is still alive at the three week mark, it will now have healthy bees emerging and should begin to build numbers and recover. That is assuming other factors such as climate do not prevent that.
 

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After finding mites in my hives a month ago, I treated all four of my hives for varroa, with hopguard 2. One hive, my most successful bustling colony, completely absconded. Now I have the three others with very spotty brood, and chewed down brood. I have also seen deformed wings. They look much worse than they did when I first opened the hives for treatment. We are getting ready for winter here, and it is supposed to be 19 degrees tomorrow night. I went in to do my final inspections and wrap my hives for winter today, only to find this very sad situation. I obviously don’t want to lose these colonies. What can I do?
These are each two deep hive bodies, and all supers have been removed.
I had thought I would go ahead and bring everyone into a single brood box and wrap. Any advice deeply appreciated.
Thanks
Hopguard and formic pro appear to me to be nearly as fatal as the varroa to newbie beekeepers colonies. I have been doing this since Jane Fonda was a hottie not hideous and I am afraid of them!
 

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LOL, very true Vance, and said with flair. :LOL:
 

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After finding mites in my hives a month ago, I treated all four of my hives for varroa, with hopguard 2. One hive, my most successful bustling colony, completely absconded. Now I have the three others with very spotty brood, and chewed down brood. I have also seen deformed wings. They look much worse than they did when I first opened the hives for treatment. We are getting ready for winter here, and it is supposed to be 19 degrees tomorrow night. I went in to do my final inspections and wrap my hives for winter today, only to find this very sad situation. I obviously don’t want to lose these colonies. What can I do?
These are each two deep hive bodies, and all supers have been removed.
I had thought I would go ahead and bring everyone into a single brood box and wrap. Any advice deeply appreciated.
Thanks
Not trying to be a jerk but I cried in my beer when that happened to me. I started in 2012 and in 2018 I tried Hopguard just to use another method to get rid of varroa. I was up to 13 colonies. 4 of them were splits so they didn't get Hopguard, they survived. If any of them make it through the winter you can start again with them or packages or nucs if not. I'm back up to 8 this year.

I have only been using OAV since 2018 and I've been very happy with my results. Most of the times my numbers have been 1 or 0. I do treat monthly.

Good Luck
 

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Thanks much!
They are looking busy, and hopefully recovering. All of the reviews I have read about hopguard were positive. Someone should put the word out if it is actually dangerous!? Why would they continue to sell a product that kills bees?? Seems contrary to everything a good bee company should be about??
I live in NorCal and just drove to Oregon to buy 190 proof grain alcohol to use with oxalic in my new fogger. Can only get up to 153 proof in CA. Who knew!
Going to treat a few times in coming weeks. I have wrapped the hives, and fed with pollen and candy... doing everything I can to support. Hopefully they make it through.
Thanks very much!
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I live in NorCal and just drove to Oregon to buy 190 proof grain alcohol to use with oxalic in my new fogger. Can only get up to 153 proof in CA. Who knew!
Snowbee, OAV and OAF are different treatments and the use of a fogger to apply the oxalic acid is an idea that has been tried and proven to be only moderately effective. The best way to apply OA is with the use of a sublimation device such as a wand or a band heater vaporizer. Use the 190 proof Everclear to make propolis tinctures and clean your hive tool.

I have been doing this since Jane Fonda was a hottie...
You made me go back and look at her costumes from Barbarella. Yowza!
 
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Hello Snowbee. I'm also from NorCal (upper Shasta county) and everyone I've talked to says this is the worst year they have ever seen for mites.

I bought 25 nucs that were treated coming off the almonds, and had low mite counts. As soon as they got a foothold I treated them with Formic quick strips, and then Apivar strips. I then hit them with one round of oxalic acid vapor from a band heater vaporizer.
I was hoping to give them a break and collect a little honey but I saw high mite numbers in a couple hives so I removed the honey supers and hit them with 3 rounds of OA 6-7 day apart. As soon as I pulled a little honey (AUG 25th) I hit them with fresh Apivar strips.
With ALL of that nearly half of my hives collapsed. I saw a little Deformed Wing Virus but it was not too bad, just a bee here and there. What I did see in all the hives that collapsed was Parasitic Mite Syndrome in nearly all the brood. This really showed up just after I put the last round of Apivar strips in and has me wondering if there is some mite kill in the brood and that triggered the bees to chew the brood down???

I can't imagine being more aggressive with my treatments? That said I'm now building my own band heater vaporizers and plan to hit the remaining hives in December and in 5 day cycles several times next year.
 
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