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Hi team! My husband and I recently captured a swarm that we found on our property. We'd been thinking about getting into beekeeping one day, but the feed store had a starter kit so we decided to jump in blind which I'm learning now was pretty irresponsible.

We got the swarm into the box about three weeks ago, and the website we used to learn how to capture the swarm said to leave them alone for 2-4 weeks, so we did. We didn't know about "bee space" or pre waxing the frames. It looks like they built their own structure between the two frames that we furthest apart.

We can't find anybody in our area (McAlester, OK - all the online forums and things haven't been updated in years) to help us 1-1 so we are truly flying blind and trying to research as we go. Any advice on next steps would be greatly appreciated.
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Yes, some plastic foundation has little to no wax applied. What it looks like though is you had the frames spread apart just as they are in the picture and they built between the frames with the open space they had. The frames need to be pushed together and 10 frames in the box. If they were tight together then they didn't accept the plastic foundation. For now I would not wreck what they have, but start from there and fix it down the road after they are strong. You need to determine what they actually did. You can pull a frame that they are working and see if they are drawing out the cell imprints on the foundation or just making a new structure apart yet attached to it. If you can't separate frames, I would leave them alone for now. If you find the foundation is being drawn out directly from the plastic cell imprints, then you only need to push all the frames together and let them go for a while. If they don't accept the foundation, you will need to apply more wax to the foundation or replace it with something better that has heavy wax on it. If there's not enough wax on them, you will have a growing mess. You can get full wax foundation, but your frames probably aren't set up for that.

Check them maybe once a week to see how much they are growing into the box. Add another box when they are working on 8 frames. You may need to move up a couple drawn frames from the first box into the second box and move undrawn ones down to encourage them to move up. You need lots of beekeeping reading to stay ahead of them. They should grow suddenly in numbers in 3 weeks when the first round of brood emerge. The swarms a little small but fully capable of growing into a healthy strong hive with what's there.

It's not irresponsible to catch a swarm without any experience. Good way to learn. I started the same way, finding a swarm in the air over my head when I got out of my car one day.
 

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DanielD has great advice.
The one thing I would add is, if you know what you're looking at in regards to the wild comb, you may have some options to clean things up. If there's brood in those wild combs, I would do as DanielD said and leave them alone for now and focus on letting the colony get established. However if it's all nectar or capped Honey, You may be better off tearing it down and feeding it back to the bees either open feeding (setting it out so they can come gather it, however other colonies can also come get it, and you also want to set it fairly far away from the hive so they don't get robbed out by stronger colonies). Or you could feed it to them in their hive. Even messing the comb up some and moving it to the outside edge of the box (being sure to push everything else together tightly), would get it out of the way and allow them to clean it up. That way you're pushing the messy comb out of the way and letting them continue on in a structured manner.

The key component though is, what is in that comb? If you aren't sure, then probably best to leave it alone for right now until they get booming.

Good luck!
 
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