Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone! I've been lurking for a little while and decided to make my first post. (I was going to make the subject "bee-ginner", but thought maybe you've heard that one before...)


I have just recently started thinking about beekeeping, and read "Beekeeping for Dummies". I am now completely obsessed. Can anyone recommend more books? I checked amazon.com, and it looks like "The Backyard Beekeeper" by Flottum/Ringle is a popular one. Any opinions on that one or other suggestions?

Also, I will be moving at the end of the month. Does anyone know of any classes, clubs, mentors, etc in eastern Colorado or western Kansas? I've done some searching online and haven't come up with anything closer than Denver or Kansas City.

Thank you!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,290 Posts
Longarm...where in the Willamette Valley. I just got into EugeneShe's at U of O, getting her masters at the school of music last night to visit my daughter, and spend a few days skiing...no snow in Vermont.
What strange weather here...green grass, and Dafodills coming up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,584 Posts
>I was going to make the subject "bee-ginner", but thought maybe you've heard that one before...

Hello works just fine


As for books, I'd just read `em all, everything you can get your hands on. Go to the library and browse, there are a lot of books, they're all the same and they're all different. Don't spend any money on books for a while, eventually you'll find a few you gotta get.

I ended up gotta getting "The Hive and The Honey Bee" which is pretty much a reference book. ABC-XYZ of Beekeeping is worth obtaining, I've got 3 copies of 2 different versions (every time I picked up some free beekeeping gear the people said "Oh, you might as well take this too". Ended up with 5 smokers the same way).

The Cornell University web site has a great section of online books, mostly older stuff. Great browsing!

http://bees.library.cornell.edu/b/bees/browse.html

Beesource is a great place to learn stuff too


You won't have any trouble finding bee people no matter where you go.

And before you ask.... start with at LEAST 2 hives, and 3 isn't too many


George-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,584 Posts
>no snow in Vermont.

None in Maine either. My daughter and her fiance went to Sugarloaf last week and they said people were leaving the mountain like the place was on fire.

There's snow in Oregon??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,965 Posts
my goodnes you mean you are right 'there' in the middle of bee heaven and there are no clubs or local beekeepers? heaven must be falling girl.

lots of literature out there... Richard Taylor wrote a book about beekeeping that reads quite well. can't think of the title right now. got a copy here... somewhere. george already mention abc-xyz can be a quite handy reference.

welcome aboard...

anyway JohnF is from out colorado way drop him pm and see what he can tell you about clubs out that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,290 Posts
>There's snow in Oregon??

Sure is...above 3000'

We'll see how this El Niño will affect the bees. Vermont is supposed to be in the 60's on saturday, after another day of rain. My home phone is ringing off the hook, with beekeepers asking how the bees will fare. I'm lovin' it, and so are the bees!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
Hi Kimbee:
Welcome to Beesource and welcome to beekeeping!
My book suggestion as a relatively new beekeeper is: BeeKeeping - A Practical Guide by Richard M Bonney.
VERY practical and helpful. It lays out not only what to do now, but what to expect throughout the rest of the season. Cover price when I bought it 3 years ago was $18.95 and I'm sure you can get it on Amazon or order it from your local bookstore.
Again, welcome to the "family" - I'm sure you'll find lots of beekeepers in your new area to help you along, but in the meantime, reading can do nothing but help you.
Looking forward to your post with subject "I hived my first package of bees today"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Kim you might drop in the chat room some eves. lot of good info and its on the spot. no good question is the one you didn't ask. we all start some where.

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,711 Posts
I also read "Beekeeping for Dummies" and liked it. "The Beekeepers Handbook" by D.Sammataro and A.Avitabile [Cornell U.Press.] is pretty "handy" too. Nice illustrations and a useful appendix/reference in the back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
I really like the book you mentioned, "The Backyard Beekeeper" but as far as a "getting started" reference, I think it is hard to beat the Dummies book. You'll want more and the Backyard book is a good next buy. As others have said, read all you can and check this site often. You'll learn loads...and of course, get bees and you'll just figure out a lot of things on your own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
I have "Starting right with Bees". Not expensive. I believe it is published by AI Root. Beesource is about as up to date as you can get. A lot of the books have good info but are rather dated.

Good Luck!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Hi Kimbee,
I am from eastern Colorado.Welcome to the High Plains desert. Except now we have some snow, though much has blown off the fields where I'm at. Not so in SE Colorado however.
There are no clubs around me. I drove 3 hours each Tues.to my Boulder,CO beekeeping class, then stayed overnite and drove back three hours this fall. In February, the Northern Colorado Beekeeping club in Greeley,CO is having a class. Not sure, but think it's on Saturdays. Google them. As you go further east in Kansas the greener it gets, so maybe you can find beeks in that direction.
Not having bees ever, I have no advice, but I'm nervous about starving my future bees since there isn't lots of vegetation around here other than wheat & corn. We farm 3,000+ acres and we have 2 trees on all that ground, lol!!And they're not next to each other!
Best wishes, Jean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,995 Posts
I used to own both the flottum and dummies book, and didn't care for either. My favs for beginners are written by:
1)Taylor
2)Bonney
3)Morse
4) Summataro

I like these books because they emphasize processes, timing and biology. I don't like the other two because they focus almost exclusively on equipment with little regard to the environment of the bees. There is also a pretty good book from Canada called something like "Beekeeping on the Prarie" that might be good for you. A mentor is also helpful but not always possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
First of all, thanks to everyone for your advice & well wishes. I will be hitting the library within the next day or two!

Tecumseh: “my goodnes you mean you are right 'there' in the middle of bee heaven and there are no clubs or local beekeepers?”

I think you must mean that Minnesota is bee heaven - unfortunately I just recently became interested, and will be moving to western Kansas in a few weeks!

Which brings me to Locust n Honey's reply....

I'm worried about starving bees too! I read in the Dummies book that you can keep bees pretty much anywhere, so I guess I'll be testing that theory.
I plan to start a nice flower garden, so hopefully between that, my neighbors' gardens and the local sunflower crop I will be able to make a go of it. I'm originally from that area, so I know it will probably be a challenge. I'll be interested to know how things go for you, keep us posted!
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top