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Hi knowledgeable people of the beekeeping world, I need some help and information regarding some unwanted visitors of your hobby/career.

Last year a ton (and i mean a ton) of honey bees took up residence in the fascia of our house. We were told by our local authorities that they wouldn't touch them because they are honey bees and are protected. They put us in touch with two beekeepers, one of which was retired and wasn't interested and the which just wasn't interested. However, they both said that during the winter they'd probably either move on or die off. This spring/summer, however, they are still here. This brings some concerns to me and my wife. Number 1, my sons bedroom window is right underneath where the bees are accessing the fascia and he can't have his bedroom window open in the summer heat because, naturally, the bees tend to come into the house (he's woken up several times with a bee on his bed somewhere and his girlfriend has been stung a couple of times). Our other concern is that the bees are producing honey in our fascia, which has now been building up over two years and we're worried that the weight of it is going to damage our house. Also, if we decide to move on nobody in their right mind is going to buy a house with a thriving bee population.

So can anybody please please please please tell me how to get rid of them?
 

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You should be able to find someone to do this for you for a fee. Search for beekeeping clubs in the area, check with emergency service providers to see if the have a list for bee removal, try any type of wildlife rescue/rehab agencies you can find. There is a UK-based forum that might be able to offer advice -- Natural Beekeeping Network

When you do find help, make sure they do a thorough removal and don't leave behind any of the comb or spilled honey. Will just lead to future problems.
 

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Sounds like the above post gave you some good tips.

Soooooo. Who's going to win between England and Algeria today?
 

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Sorry you can't get a decent response from your local beekeepers but keep trying, I am sure there is someone in your area that can help. Couple of things. This type of removal is called a cut out and it is lots of work. You may find someone to remove the bees but doesn't have the ability or skill to repair your fascia once they are removed, so it may help that you have a carpenter already lined up when you get in touch with the beek. I know I am more apt to do a removal if the owner says to just remove them and they will handle fixing up the wall, roof or whatever. Also, even if these bees die for some reason, next spring a new colony will take their place as it is an established hive area, so when you do get them removed and your fascia repaired make sure all empty space is filled with expandable foam or similar product or they will be back.

Good luck.
 

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Honeybee colonies can last many years and don't always die-out in the winter. In fact if they've found a nice warm, dry secure location, which is probably what we have between your walls, then they could be there for many years to come. I would get them out as soon as possible, before the colony really starts growing. The nest will expand greatly this summer and then you run the risk of these bees starting to swarm.

A beekeeper experienced in doing "cutouts" can usually get them out with not to much drama. The degree of difficultly of the cutout will determine how many willing beekeepers you can find to do this for you. If you can find a volunteer beekeeper, many will do it just for the bee's and honeycomb, possible their gas money or other nominal expenses reimbursed. If you have to call a professional removal pest company, they may charge you quite a sum of money so I would definitely go with a local beekeeper skilled with doing cutouts as my first option. You, the homeowner will then have to repair the woodwork yourself, as the beekeeper will remove whatever is in his way to get at the nest. That's how it works. He gets the bees/comb/honey (although he may share some of the honey), you get the bees/comb out and then are responsible for patching your house back up.

Your appeal here is a good start. Beeks from all over the world hangout on Beesource including UK Beeks. Expand your (area) search also. Local or regional beekeeper clubs are your best bet. Utility companies, police and even pest removal companies sometimes keep names of beekeepers that they can contact for a honeybee situation. Some people have even appealed to the local news (local human interest stories) and a volunteer has come forward. Best of luck
 

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Very odd.

As a last resort (and I don't know anything about UK law) you could kill them and then open it up to remove the combs and bees. But from what I have heared I would make sure your not going to run a foul of some crazy law. You have to remove the comb and honey or it will make a mess when the bees are gone and invite other pests in.

On the other hand - YOU could take up beekeeping :D
Build a hive and do your own trap out. Produce your own honey - sell honey, pollen, wax, propalis, bees...

Mike
 

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Google the BBKA and there is a list of swarm liason officers, just get in touch with the nearest.or alternativly go onto a British beekeeping forum
 
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