Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So...this would mostly apply to the south west area of the US.

Is there a guideline on what temperatures you have to start dealing with head induced collapse of melted comb?

And how often does this happen in these kinds of areas? Is it pretty common or rare? (Considering a move to AZ...its quite common for temperatures in parts of the state to easily be 110+ in certain summer months.)
 

·
Registered
Wild bees
Joined
·
21 Posts
We don't get very high temperatures here very often but occasionally it gets to 110 or so. I've never seen a case of comb collapse but I use plastic foundation, even in the supers. The bees use water on the comb to reduce the temperature of the comb.

I think the temperature of the comb would have to exceed 140 degrees F before it would collapse.

I don't know if this has any effect, but I started putting rigid foam insulation inside my telescoping covers (about R-10 total with the wood). This does a good job of eliminating moisture condensation on the inside of the inner cover in the winter and may help reduce conduction heating in the summer (from sunshine on the cover).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
I have seen a lot of this kind of damage done mostly to newly made honey comb, like still white honey comb. But that's mostly just a function of it being brand new and it still needs to cure and harden. The bees also tend to reinforce comb with propolis and other materials like cocoons in high traffic areas so it probably won't be a major problem. If you are really worried about weak comb in hot hives, avoid foundationless comb set ups, if you are super worried about it, use plastic foundation and make sure the hives have plenty of ventilation. Vent boxes and screened bottom boards will be your friend in AZ.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top