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Hi All,
we are newbies to beekeeping. We have two hives and one lost its queen which we replaced. The other hive was going strong and we saw the queen when we inspected it. She had a green spot which made it easy. The last time I looked (last weekend) i couldn't find her. the top supper was full of honey, however the bottom honey was 2/3 empty no honey and no brood that i could see just empty cells. My suspicion is the queen has gone, I was thinking of identifying a frame in the other hive with eggs in it and placing it in this hive so they could, If I'm right develop a queen cell(s) on this frame and replace her that way. I figured if I'm wrong they will just raise the brood as workers. Any help much appreciated.
 

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You are correct; if you place a frame of eggs and larvae (the larvae needs to be < 4 days old (under 3 is better) or eggs AND if there is no queen then the hive will create a queen cell (or many) and if not they will be raised as workers. An easy trick to find out for certain. If you aren't seeing eggs/larvae then it is a good guess that you are not queen right and you need to do something before you end up with a laying worker (which is no fun at all to deal with)!
 

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I'm a newbee too, and I did exactly what you are saying on purpose this year to make a third hive. Dug out some frames with eggs from my best hive, left the nurse bees on and stuck them in a nuc box, fed them and gave them some pollen and let them be. I watched the calendar and right on time, I had a third laying queen. So yeah, if you give this queenless hive a frame of eggs and brood, they know exactly what to do. It's pretty cool to watch.
 

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Hi All,
we are newbies to beekeeping. We have two hives and one lost its queen which we replaced. The other hive was going strong and we saw the queen when we inspected it. She had a green spot which made it easy. The last time I looked (last weekend) i couldn't find her. the top supper was full of honey, however the bottom honey was 2/3 empty no honey and no brood that i could see just empty cells. My suspicion is the queen has gone, I was thinking of identifying a frame in the other hive with eggs in it and placing it in this hive so they could, If I'm right develop a queen cell(s) on this frame and replace her that way. I figured if I'm wrong they will just raise the brood as workers. Any help much appreciated.
You might be better off buying a mated queen than waiting the time for a queen cell to be made and a virgin hatched and mated and laying.
 

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I agree with Cloverdale. There may not be enough time to raise a queen and much of any brood before winter. I'd have to buy a queen and install her and have at least a couple rounds of brood for overwintering.
 

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There is that time gap while you wait for the bees to make a queen, wait for her to come back from mating flights, and start laying. It wasn't at all an issue during the nectar flow. If you don't want to wait or can't wait, buy a queen. I did that just recently too...decided I didn't want to risk waiting for her to come back (what if she didn't) as we are running out of summer, but I also wanted to add some different genetics to my hives so a purchased queen made sense. Good thing too...the virgin that emerged from the QC I stuck in a mini nuc never came back. Pros and cons both ways. But I can't wait for next year and try my hand at raising queens in earnest.
 
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