Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I observed something which I've never seen before and not expected. Last night I noticed a small swarm in a neighbor's Bottle Brush bush.

I intended to collect the swarm this morning since it was to cold last night, even in San Diego, since it is the beginning of January. When I took a look this morning I found that the swarm had left, but a few bees remained, either they were out scouting when the missing bees departed or were too cold to follow.

Some of the remaining bees were doing a waggle dance on the branch! :scratch:

I've never seen this before, has anyone else, maybe I've just not taken the time to look?

Check it out for yourself here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,940 Posts
I have seen them dance on a swarm proper and I have seen scouts show back up after the swarm had gone but this I have not seen. I guess the place she found she felt was soo good she had to share anyway. :D
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
Yes, I have. It's easy to do even if you don't have a swarm. Take a package of bees, tie the queen in the branch and wait for them to collect on the queen. After a while they will start doing the waggle dances to get the swarm to go where they have found a location. When you're tired of watching, put the queen and the bees in a hive. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,827 Posts
Tom Seeley spoke at last fall’s GBA. His talks alone were worth the price of admission! In one experiment, he set up 10 empty 'bee nests' of differing 'desirability' at different locations on an isolated island (no honey bees). He put an artificial swarm in the middle of the island. He was testing to see how dependably the swarm would select the most desirable nest and how they went about choosing it. He video recorded scout bees dancing on the outside of the swarm and could determine which nest they had found (in my opinion, it appeared to be a solid confirmation of von Frisch's work). By the way, as I recall, they picked the absolute best nest about 80% of the time and never chose one at the bottom of the desirability list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,964 Posts
Michael Bush wrote: Yes, I have. It's easy to do even if you don't have a swarm. Take a package of bees, tie the queen in the branch and wait for them to collect on the queen. After a while they will start doing the waggle dances to get the swarm to go where they have found a location.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Tom Seeley spoke at last fall’s GBA
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Tom seely set up a situation at EAS this year (just as Mike says) and some of us watched the process. Of course the caged queen called the bees back but they found the new location and swarmed it.

dickm
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top