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Has anyone come across this? I've been seeing these symptoms growing in my operation for 3 years. Piles of dead bees in front of affected hives like a pesticide poisoning but in many yards including Modesto and Chico almonds, Southern Oregon pears, Willamette meadowfoam and clover. This spreads to neighboring hives. Some are killed due to collapse and queenlessness. Others go on to recover but may show signs at a later time. In the hives, bees have a shivering motion and are subdued. Early on, hives may be heavier than others in the yard. Late in the course, hives are light, often with no pollen stores though unaffected hives have good pollen. Affected hives will have bees which are chewed by guards. Evicted bees will appear to be trying to elicit feeding. Within hours, these bees lose the ability to fly then to walk. Some bees in the hive are hairless and shiny. Many of the dead are younger fuzzy housebees. Drones will often predominate early on in the die-off. Our bees have been tested for tracheal mites and nosema and were reported clean, including samples from sick hives. Varroa counts were acceptable with a powdered sugar shake count of 3 to 5 in mid June. Winter losses were 6% and most qualified for almond pollination. Talking with Dr. Eric Mussen, the cure is resistant bees. He suggests LaFore patties which will be available from Glory Bee at some future date. Others suggest an essential oil drench and feeding sub patties. This paralysis virus is spread by fecal contamination, thus, nosema presence would exacerbate the spread. There are some good web sites on this syndrome. It is also briefly mentioned in this month's ABJ. Anyone experiencing this condition in your bees please respond.
 

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We saw this happen early spring in California. Exact symptoms. We had a researcher come out and take samples, but have yet to get the results. Thanks for the link, it will be great to do some research on this problem.

We also were told about the essential oil packets, and tried them, but the bees were maybe too far gone by that point to make much difference. Same with the drench. We did have some luck by adding frames of brood to the dwindling hives. Generally, the hives that had brood and young bees added seemed to pull out of it.

Tina
 
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