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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good day. I have two main questions that i will try to keep brief. This is my first year and first/only hive that came from a package.
1. It took the package 7 weeks to draw out the first 8 of 10 frames of plastic foundation. I added a second deep hive body last week and the bees drew out 8 of the 10 frames in one week (sucking down some sugar syrup 1:1). I know their numbers are growing but is that normal to draw out the second hive body so fast?
2. I had planned on requeening with a local queen anyway. Now I am considering splitting the bees and taking a frame or two of bees and brood to a nuc along with the queen and leaving the original hive with a new queen.

My questions: Is this a bad idea? Are their fallacies in my plan/logic? If I do this, should I move the nuc far away from the original hive? If so, how far? Have you ever had success with something like this?

Thank you all sooooo much!!! Screen Shot 2015-05-17 at 4.08.12 PM.jpg Screen Shot 2015-05-17 at 4.05.52 PM.jpg
 

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Question #1....no such thing as drawing comb too fast.

#2....your queen has a very nice brood pattern (she's a keeper), but you can split and add a new queen if you want to increase your hive count. You don't have to move the nuc far away, but if you keep it close you will loose most of your present foragers (they will go back to the original hive). Make sure you give the nuc something to eat (honey & pollen). A couple of frames of brood like you have pictured will rebound quickly. Good luck.
 

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If you split, move the queen into the split. She will continue to lay, and foragers will return to main hive to keep it strong till it makes a queen. Don't make the split weak. It needs adequate honey, pollen, and bees. Since the foragers will be at queenless split, it will be strong to protect from mites, moths, disease. The queen in split will recover faster so those issues will not. be present either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've searched on BeeSource but haven't found much on specific details/instructions on "How To" perform a split like this. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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If I understand you correctly, you are planning on obtaining a local queen for the split?

Here's how I make splits (or nucs) from an established colony:
1) Get an empty brood box.
2) Select a couple frames of capped & uncapped brood (eggs & larva) and put them in the empty box.
3) Select a couple frames of honey & pollen and put them in the empty box.
4) Replace the frames you've pulled with empty frames.
5) Put a queen excluder on top of the donor hive.
6) Put the box with the pulled frames of brood, pollen & honey on top of the excluder.
7) Put on the top cover and go away for a few hours (or overnight).
8) When you come back, your brood frames will be covered with nurse bees.
Now you can put those frames in a nuc box or single brood box, and you have your split.
Wait 24 hours before adding your purchased queen. Since the nurse bees have not been out of the parent colony, they won't drift back, so it doesn't matter where you put the new hive.

I've done this for years and like this method since it doesn't require finding the queen of the parent colony and doesn't require moving the new colony to a different location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Awesome Indy. Thank you. Yes, I was going to obtain a local queen. I hated the thought of pinching a great laying queen so I wanted to find a way to keep her and multiply my first (and only) hive!! Any other suggestions are welcome.

Gather 2 beekeepers and get 3 opinions!
 

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Awesome Indy. Thank you. Yes, I was going to obtain a local queen. I hated the thought of pinching a great laying queen so I wanted to find a way to keep her and multiply my first (and only) hive!! Any other suggestions are welcome.

Gather 2 beekeepers and get 3 opinions!
When you replace the four frames do not put them all in the middle of brood. Maybe just one in the brood nest with others to either side, or both sides.
 
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