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Discussion Starter #1
My husband left the cover off our top bar hive after inspecting the combs and it rained that night. We let the surface dry out and replaced the cover. I don't think the inside of the hive itself got wet ( I can't be sure), but now the surface edges of some of the bars look green, like they have mildew or something from the moisture. Also, we have been noticing a LOT of bearding after those heavy rains. So 3 questions: If rain water had gotten into the hive is that a problem? Is there a a safe way to get rid of the mildew or whatever it is on those bars? Is the bearding a sign of something wrong in the hive (like too much humidity?). Thanks!
 

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I also prop the tops of the outer cover in the heat. This allows for a lot more heat exchanged than if you have a closed outer cover on top of the top bars.
 

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I also prop the tops of the outer cover in the heat. This allows for a lot more heat exchanged than if you have a closed outer cover on top of the top bars.
The bars seem fairly well glued together with propolis. I am wondering how propping the outer lid up would allow for more heat to escape? Does just the flow of air over the top of the bars themselves work like ventilation?
 

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If the outer cover it tight to the top bars there is no air movement (or little). Still air is great insulation, that's why we have a gap in multi pane windows, it doesn't allow for much heat transfer, so it traps some of the heat inside. By having a gap you allow for some airflow over the top of the bars. And the bars are going to transfer heat from the hot side to the cold side. In the winter the opposite is better, so having more still air above the hive should keep them warmer. This is why you see folks using foam insulation on top of their hives in the winter.
 
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