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http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay...gId=10051&cmRelshp=rel&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1

This is what I’m using to tie my hives down. I added I bolts to both sides of my hive stands, tie the rope to one side and use this on the other. You can tie or untie it in about 2 seconds. Rope can be replaced every few years. Easy to change based on height. Not as solid as a ratchet strap but not nearly as expensive. I’m really pleased, thought I’d share and start a thread so others can tell us what they’ve done. Bricks on top was NOT an option as my hives are in plain sight of the house. My hives have to look nice for the wife…. I’m not sure bricks would do for our Hurricane force winds. I hope this does, it’s certainly better than nothing. I’m getting some more for my trailer, great to tie anything down.
 

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I've got a number of the figure 9 devices for use around the shop. for my hives, I use 550 paracord and a simple truckers hitch. the have a mechanical advantage of 2, so you can get them rather snug, and they don't cost anything. 550 cord can be purchase in a 1/4mile spool for about 70-80 bucks. many people don;t need that much, but i use it for a lot of thigns. and like to have an ample supply on hand.

heres a link to an image of the simple knot I'mreferring to.
http://and-cesbo.livejournal.com/23246.html

this one gives a little animated "how to" at the bottom.
https://www.netknots.com/rope_knots/truckers-hitch/
 

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Don't skimp on ratchet straps, buy good ones. The HF might very well be good ones, I haven't used any of them to be able to say, but as mentioned above HF has some decent stuff if you shop smart.

I've seen ratchets where the springs and releases will simply fall out if you don't perfectly press the latches. Look at the ratchet assembly...is it simply some stamped plate metal pieces held together simply by spring-pressure with too much "play" in the assembly? Look for something with a bit more refined machining/finishing to it. Oh, and they need decently strong springs...no wimpy springs.

I've also seen some frightfully thin straps that are strong enough to hold a hive assembly together, but thin enough to easily get tangled/folded when being ratcheted. Heavier straps are better for using as a carrying handle/strap, too.

Good ratchet straps will last a long, long time. You'll probably lose them before you where them out so buy good ones...wherever you buy them from.

Something that I'm fretting over is whether to trim the long straps to "hive length" straps. The ones that I've used the last couple of years are about 15' long. I keep about half of the strap length rolled up and secured in a bundle that just dangles there and flops around. I keep saying I'm going to trim a piece off of it, but then I think "what if I want to use it for....". :rolleyes: I need to decide if I want to make them dedicated hive straps or not...for now it gives me something to ponder during those times of personal reflection.:D

Ed
 

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I used the HFT straps for the second half of winter in conjunction with their moving blankets. Cheap and they worked well enough.
 

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I'm not saying I would trust them with more expensive heavy cargo on a road trip.

But they are as good as they appear when you are holding them. So, if you have decent judgment and look at them and think they can handle the load, chances are they will work fine.

I've used them for kick drums on top of a suburban for a 2 hour road trip and never worried about it. Though the wind did start to beat up the straps a bit.
 
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