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In a checkerboarding thread, somebody (Mike Palmer, I think) mentioned concerns about granulated honey developin in the hive over winter. I did not want to hijack that thread, so I started this one.

That was the first time I had heard that there was reason to be concerned about honey granulating in the hive over winter. I've never seen that in my hives, but I'm not sure how I'd know what I'm supposed to be seeing.

Questions:

1. What is the problem/why don't the bees just dissolve the honey? (They can eat granulated sugar, after all).

2. Is is more of a problem up north?

3. How do you know whether honey inside a capped frame is granulated?

4. What do you do about it, if anything?

Thanks,

Neil
 

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Questions:

1. What is the problem/why don't the bees just dissolve the honey? (They can eat granulated sugar, after all).

I don`t think it is a BIG problem--I am sure there will bee lots of answers so I B first.

2. Is is more of a problem up north?

Not sure

3. How do you know whether honey inside a capped frame is granulated?

I have tried to extract some that was granulated but with no luck after uncappind I set it out for the bees to clean or put it back in a hive and they will take care of it.

4. What do you do about it, if anything?

see answer above.


Thanks, Neil
 
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Hi NeilV,

While we don't experience bitterly cold winters here, they say some nectars, aster nectar comes to mind, can granulate quickly.

One thing I have noticed over the years, especially when the weather is very cold, is that my bees need water, lots of it. When their water sources freeze up, I go out in the morning with hot water to make sure they have access to liquid H2O.

If granulation has occurred, my understanding is water is essential for them to process the honey.

Cheers, Donna Marie
 

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>1. What is the problem/why don't the bees just dissolve the honey? (They can eat granulated sugar, after all).

They do.

>2. Is is more of a problem up north?

I don't see a problem. Sometimes it granulates, especially the goldenrod honey.

>3. How do you know whether honey inside a capped frame is granulated?

It does look slightly different, but all in all, I don't care anyway. :) If I uncap some and it's granulated, it's obvious then, and it does not extract well.

>4. What do you do about it, if anything?

I do nothing about it.
 

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Michael Bush;488428 I do nothing about it.[/QUOTE said:
Does that mean it is not a problem and nothing to be concerned with?

How about water? With the cold here the bees can't make it more than a few feet before they fall to the snow, so realistically I can't give them water. Does this pose a problem? I can't really see them making honey stores etc. to get them through winter yet needing to go out and get water.
 

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>Does that mean it is not a problem and nothing to be concerned with?

That is my opinion. Obviously there are those who think it is an issue.

>How about water?

The bees get water in the winter from condensation. They are producing a huge amount of water from metabolism.

> With the cold here the bees can't make it more than a few feet before they fall to the snow, so realistically I can't give them water.

They don't need to leave the hive.

> Does this pose a problem?

No.

> I can't really see them making honey stores etc. to get them through winter yet needing to go out and get water.

They can't go get water nor do they need to as there is usually too much water in the hive from condensation already.
 

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Seems like bees have been dealing with granulated honey in their hives for millennia...let them worry about it. They know what to do.
 
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