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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just did a removal of a dead colony in the rafters of an old church. I don't think starvation was the reason for their death, because there was so much honey left in the combs near to the cluster of dead bees. I must have pulled out two medium supers worth of sealed granulated honey in all. I'm thinking that there is no way to save the honey without heating it up for a long while, but I want to save as much of the wax as possible. What is the best way to go about separating the wax from the granulated honey? Any chance of reliquifying the honey without damaging it? Thanks.
 

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How do you know someone didn't spray insecticide into that colony? How did they die? You wouldn't want to eat that honey then. Or even use the wax.
 

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Omie, the guy in charge of maintenance (who has been there many years) told me that the bees were there for about 3 years, at no time did they attempt to kill them, they really didn't bother anyone because the entrance was about 30 ft. off the ground, and they don't own a ladder to reach that high. Robber bees were causing a problem this spring inside the church, flying around the windows trying to get out, that's how I got involved. I know that bees can starve with honey only inches away, and the more I think about it, this may have been what happened. There was a ceiling rafter separating the dead bees in the brood area from the honey storage area (where all the granulated honey was).
 
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