Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a favorite specs for their grafting set up. I've never done this before and I'm just trying to get an idea of how careful I need to be when grafting. For example, there is a cool room in our cabin, and I am planning on running a humidifier when I graft (mid to late June) and I was planning on having a reading lamp over my head to help me see the tiny 12 hour old larva. Also the bee yard is a 1/4 mile up the mountain from our cabin. Am I going overboard with the humidifier? Will lamp light damage larva? Is a 1/4 mile walk with a frame of young larva too much? How much of a window do I have before I need to put the grafted cells in the cell finisher nuc?
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
Cover the grafts with a wet towel. Work quickly. I'd worry more about good light, and no fan to dry them out. I do it at the kitchen table. I turn off the fan (if one is running) and do it quickly and take them back out quickly. I've done it in the front seat of the minivan in outyards...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Covering both works well for me. I cut strips of paper towels, wet them and warm them in the microwave and cover the cells on the bar as I go. A warm damp towel works best for taking to the yard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
in most of my yards i have a 5 gallon bucket to sit on when needed i have just used a hive that is just the wright height for my table and grafted about daylight in the yard ( the moisture is higher in the morning, i use the jzbz wide base cell cups and i will gently press the cell cups at the base of the frame of larva 8/10 put in my royal jelly then graft then pull them off and place in a dampened blue shop towel until i have all the grafts needed then place on cell bar and place in the frame and place in the cell builder. i also use a pocket led light this works great you can move the light so you can see the tiniest larva lot better than a over head light.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
I open up the queen cell builder colony, make sure it is stocked and ready to receive grafts, and that there is an opening to receive the cell bar. Then I open the donor colony, select a frame to graft from, I have a super sitting on end in front of my plastic yard chair, I prime the cups, then graft. As soon as the grafts are ready (about three to five minutes later), I place them in the cell builder, close it up. Return the donor frame, close the donor hive -- all done.

This plastic chair under a Mesquite tree in my front yard is my grafting room and an empty super setting on end is my grafting table.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,274 Posts
Like MB I've used my truck cab numerous times and also the tailgate. As long as you work fast and stay in the shade you're good to go without a fancy setup. Grafting rooms are for beeks that are grafting hundreds or thousands of cells daily; nice to have, but not really a requirement. Damp towels work great for humidity control.
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
I get the donor frame from the yard and go straight into the kitchen and graft, so I don't have time to put a towel on them, but if I was interrupted and had to deal with something, yes, I'd cover the donor frame with a towel also. The box I'm putting the cell frames in is covered with a wet towel both to keep drying air out and get moisture in. Like everyone said, if you are doing thousands it becomes an issue. if you are doing a hundred or two it's more about speed.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top