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I found a little health food store along my travels today and picked up an ounce of Lemongrass Oil for $5.40 tax and all...so of course now I want to mess around with the stuff. Somewhere on this forum, I read that to check if a site is suitable to place a bait hive one should place a feeder with a few drops of LGO on it and after a determined amount of time check for activity. Does anyone have additional info on this? I have thought to try a test case with my hives..that is to place a feeder 200 yrds away on a day the bees are active and see how long it takes to see activity...Is it a worth while endevor or am I just reinventing the wheel? (Is there a known distance/time corolation already) If not, would anybody else be interested in running the same test and comparing notes? I could use a chick feeder (base is red, that might help) with 1:1 and 2-3 drops LGO on top. What do you think, good, bad, suggestions?
 

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I think if you place feed 200 yds from your bees they'll find it no matter what.
Maybe put out one with the LGO and one without and watch the difference.
This plan would be more useful in a place more that 3 miles from your bees to see if it's a good spot for a swarm trap.

BTW, I don't think bees can see red
their sight favors the blue/UV end of the spectrum (I think that's right)

Dave
 

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I love this forum, cause I learn something everytime I log on...Didn't know bees don't see red.

I guess what I am wondering about is first..is there a distance from a known colony that is optimum for placing a bait hive. second, can the time it takes bees to find a feeder be an indication of how close their hive is? and then can I use feeders to identify the most likey areas to have sucess with a bait hive?
 

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go to the top of the page and use the "search" thingy and look for "bait hives"
I think you'll find lots of discussion
I believe the general consensus is about a quarter mile away and 10-15 feet up is best. There's also debate on size, I use a medium hive with a piece of old comb in it. I always try to catch my own swarms cause it sucks when they get in a neighbors wall:doh:

Dave
 

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:thumbsup: There is a LOT of BS on this site!! But then there is a LOT of very good informatin, also!! Read and learn!! Grain of salt thing.

Experence is a very demanding teacher.
 

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can the time it takes bees to find a feeder be an indication of how close their hive is? and then can I use feeders to identify the most likey areas to have sucess with a bait hive?
I put a hummingbird feeder in my backyard for the sole purpose to see if bees would come to it. I put a drop of lgo and spearmint oil on the top of the feeder. About 2 hours later went out and checked. It was covered in bees. These are from a feral hive behind my house somewhere. I don't keep the feeder fill up. But I fill it once a month or so. But I can go out there at almost anytime of the day and wait 10 minutes and there will be 1-2 bees flying around it to see if anything is in it. So....I set up a bait hive in my backyard know there was a hive close by. Caught a swarm in it the same day I put it out.

So if you put out some bait feeders and the feeders are covered with bees. It's probably a good area to set a bait hive.
 

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it took me a while to teach my wife that the hummingbird feeders that have a drop of feed hanging beneath a tube will be mobbed by bees, ones that the hummer has to dip it's beek into from above cause's no problem (the bee's tongue is too short)

Dave
 

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What I've read is to put a few drops of lgo in the hive that you have 10' or more in the air if you want to catch a swarm. Oh, you must have some drawn comb in the hive also before they will inhabit it. Has anyone else heard this?
 

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it took me a while to teach my wife that the hummingbird feeders that have a drop of feed hanging beneath a tube will be mobbed by bees, ones that the hummer has to dip it's beek into from above cause's no problem (the bee's tongue is too short)
Dave


That's the kind I have. It has 4 little frowers with the feed just about to drop.

No my mind is thinking...how to make one....that will hold 5 gallons of feed. huh.....My new community feeder wheels are spinning. :)
 

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What I've read is to put a few drops of lgo in the hive that you have 10' or more in the air if you want to catch a swarm. Oh, you must have some drawn comb in the hive also before they will inhabit it. Has anyone else heard this?
That's pretty much correct. Though I put traps within arms reach. 7' or less. The one I caught in my back yard was on the ground. Dark drawn comb with a few drops of lgo works great.
 

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What I've read is to put a few drops of lgo in the hive that you have 10' or more in the air if you want to catch a swarm. Oh, you must have some drawn comb in the hive also before they will inhabit it. Has anyone else heard this?
these tricks do make it more LIKELY you will bee successfull, but are not required.i had a swarm last year in a junked water heater :) hope to come your way when it warms up to visit the park. good luck,mike
 
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