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Discussion Starter #1
Are they permeable? The catalog said they were sting proof but wanted to know if anyone had experience with these? My hubby is going to help me reverse hive bodies and he's nervous so I was hoping to find some good gloves.
 

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Goatskin gloves of any sort I think are about the best texture but.....personally........ I'd save the $$ and tell him to man up and go bare. Maybe a pair of standard leather work gloves. Plenty of smoke and MOVE SLOWLY. Crack the two apart with hive tool and a wisp of smoke through the crack. Pause, deep breath, tilt the top one up as you pull it back a bit (I hate when they slide right off and land in front of the hive). Lift and set the top super on the upside down cover that is on the ground. (diagonally on it – not in it - don't crush the hangy down parts)Set the lower super off to the side standing on end or set across an empty super, or you could hold it as it is probably empty and light. Clean off the bottom board of dead bees with hive tool and bee brush and then carefully move the top one from the cover to the bb. Other one on top, replace lid, all done.
MOVE YOUR HANDS SLOWLY ! Enjoy - take pics :D

Oh and don't stand in front of the hive! My brother in law got stung every time he opened a hive until I finally saw where he was standing. "Don't know what to tell you, I've never had them crawl up my pants!"
 

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Unless they have greatly improved, they are not sting proof. Go to the pharmacy and get some purple in color "Nitrel" rubber gloves that are puncture proof, doctors, and surgeons use them. I went out to the truck to look, and my gloves were bought at WalMart, and are Nitrilo by name. They come in boxes of 75-100, and cost less than $20.00. They are better than goat skin because you can handle the frames with more control.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the advice Ronnie and Naturegoods!

Ronnie, I've just watched a few youtube videos and saw those gloves, wondered why people would wear them because they look so thin. Thanks for the explanation... I WANT THOSE!
 

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I agree with Ronnie........ If I am doing Nucs where
dexterity is not too needed I use thick gloves.

But for every day....... Nitrile are great. The only issue
(and it's a big one for me) is sweating hands. To curb
this I use those thin cotton knit gloves from Menards
under them.
 

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They are good gloves but they are not sting proof, I have yet to find anything that is sting proof, welding gloves maybe. I use the nitrel gloves when I use them. They are cheap and work much better in my opinion.
 

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tell him to man up and go bare.
I am sure you mean well by offering your advice, but IMHO this advice is just plain irresponsible. You have no idea what people's reactions are to stings, and if that reaction can change over time or for what reasons it could change. From someone who has spent a year at the allergist getting desensitized and has researched this very thoroughly, I am sorry to see anyone on beesource recommended that going without protective gear is a sign of "strength"

If you don't use Protective gear, good for you.. that works for you, but please do not suggest that others follow that approach, especially folks that are fearful. For many of us it has nothing to do with fear, it is what is physically safe, and/or what makes us comfortable and relaxed around bees. And for those who are fearful, so what? Put on the gloves and everything else, and if that helps you be around bees, there is nothing wrong with that.
 

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Winevines:applause: Brovo on your post. to tell some one to man up is not good. as a beek some times I were gloves other times nope but my young adult son puts on the whole garb just because thats his level of comfort.
So Bravo again on your post:applause:
 

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Hate to disagree with WineVines... but I agree with the "go bare" mentality... to a point.

If you are afraid of working with the bees, you are more likely to be stung! I wear a veil that ties around my chest. My 'jacket' is a white buttonup shirt that tucks into my pants. Elastics around my sleeves. I only started wearing thin blue nitrile gloves (mechanics gloves) this spring to keep my hands cleaner while handling a dead-out I had from the winter. Tuck the pants into the socks.

Of course, I knew ahead of time I wasn't allergic to beestings. And my mentor felt that gloves were a bad thing because they reduced your dexterity... can't feel the frames... more likely to squish bees, which will make more bees angry.

Admittedly, I may keep using the blue nitrile gloves this coming season, since it keeps the hands clean. Not sure I'd consider them sting-proof; and since they aren't tight around the wrist, there is space for a bee to go exploring.

It's all about comfort levels; and remembering that just because you're comfortable, doesn't mean the bees are. You could have a day when you are nervous and the bees are super calm... and a day when you're super calm, and the bees are nervous or angry. Got nailed with no veil on last week because of that. (bee in the hair... when it got out, it retaliated with a sting in a forehead, which set off a few other bees... and sent me running for the veil!)

The key thing to remember... work slowly. If your husband is nervous... just remind him to slow down, take a deep breath, and for the love of god DON'T DROP ANYTHING! (Nothing worse than dropping a frame of bees just because one bumped you!)

I find with me, I have a delayed reaction with beestings... it's usually the day after when it really swells and itchs. 4 stings in one hand last year... woke up the next morning... VERY swollen.

And if you ever end up with a dead-out, let your husband try handling it (if he has fears). That was how I first learned... pulling apart a couple dead winter hives to clean them out for new splits. Lets you get a feel for the frames in your fingertips, how to pry, etc.
 

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the goatskin gloves from Mann Lake are great.

If you have elastic in the sleeves then goatskin "driving" gloves also work great. If they are snug you will not have a problem picking up frames
 

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If I feel like wearing my goatskin gloves, I do. It all depends on the weather, the amount of hives worked, the temperament of the hives, my hive or someone else's, etc. etc. It's a hobby and should be enjoyed, he should wear them if he feels more comfortable with them. Later on, he will probably find that the relationship with bees is really quite enhanced without wearing gloves - the zen of beekeeping, so to speak. They crawl all over, they are quite curious and they learn your body scent and probably will sting him much less if at all, than the occasional bee inspector. OMTCW
 

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I bought 2 pair of Goatskin gloves from one of the big hardware stores last spring (I think it was $15 for a 2-pair pack). They are awesome, very smooth and supple. Lets just say that they have been "tested" many, many times and so far, they have been completely sting-proof.

Cant understand this "no protection" mentality. I aint scared of getting stung, I just choose to reduce my chances becasue I dont particulary enjoy the experience. And Zen my butt - I can feel my way around a hive just fine with my goatskins on.

Maybe it's because in my job, I cant walk out into an undeveloped open field without a hard hat, safety glasses, steel-toed boots, and gloves. Safety first!
 

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Find a friend/contact who works in a medical/dental office. We pay about $4/box for the nitrile gloves. Buy them a little on the larger side ( i.e.,buy large if normally a medium). Dust a little baby powder on the outside if they are sticky from propolis, you can usually get 2-3 uses out of them before they are toast. Hang them somewhere where the sweat can dry out of the inside so they are easy to put on the next time. The bees don't seem to like the feeling of the nitrile, and move off them pretty quickly. I have not been stung on the hands yet... yet....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If gloves get in the way sometimes would it be helpful to purchase one of those frame clamps? Has anyone tried those before? Most of my beekeeping equipment arrived today but I thought about the clamp and possibly that frame holder that hooks onto the side of the hive.
 

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The light weight gloves, with the ventilation band above the wrist, are as good as I have seen. The leather is thin enough not to impede you, and while thin, I have never been stung through them. I imagine there is a Super Bee out there that could. They are $9.95 from Dadant, or $15.95 on ebay with shipping included. I love them! Your hands will sweat like crazy in the nitrile gloves.
 

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I would not recommend anyone wear nitrile gloves for reversing boxes. They are great for manipulating frames, but they are horrible for doing manual work. The first sharp edge you catch shreds them.

For doing manual work like reversing boxes, wear bulky leather work gloves. You aren't worried about finesse when reversing boxes.

I don't wear gloves when manipulating frames, unless the bees are really defensive. (poor weather, etc. - nitrile or goatskin gloves)
I do wear nitrile gloves when doing cutouts - and I have to keep putting new gloves on as they get torn up. I want some protection as the bees tend to be upset when you cut open their home with a chainsaw, but I want finesse in handling removed combs covered in bees.
I wear leather work gloves when doing manual work like moving/carrying hives.
 

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you can usually get 2-3 uses out of them before they are toast. Hang them somewhere where the sweat can dry out of the inside ....
Need I say more.
Well Soap I am back and now you have every opinion there is on gloves. I don't take disagreement personal, I'm married. Personally, it is rare that I wear gloves, it is rare that I get stung accidently. Been doing this so long I don't remember if I wore them when I was new but I probably did. My std.goat skin beekeepers gloves been around for 15 years before the fingertip wore out of one finger, probably from treating them like work gloves while doing cut outs. Put a work glove over that one and kept on cutting!
So here we go again, GET THE FRAME TOOL! Your hives are new and you can get the frames out but that won't last forever. Over time they will get tighter and near impossible to get the first one out, also when harvesting honey you can hold the heavy frame with one hand and brush bees off with the other. They make a great one handed handle and last forever.
Frame holder.....? I use my teeth :D ( my hives are on pallets, I lean them against the super)
To the alergic to bee sting folks - don't believe everything the docs have to say. After 15 years of getting stung I had an alergic reaction to three long stings in the shoulder for joint pain. (long meaning leave the stingers in) Two weeks later it happened again - test case of two quick stings for elbow. Doc says 'people develope allergies over time' ... wrong answer; I have cut outs scheduled for the next three weekends! Give me an epipen!
Allergic reaction... immune system..... thyroid gland......iodine.....I had quit using table salt with iodine in it and switched to sea salt (too many cooking shows) Upped my iodine intake via topical application, multi vitamin for selenium and all the rest, back to occationally getting stung with no alergic reaction. Six months later the shoulder and elbow still feel fine too!
Enjoy the bees - I have got to quit this posting habit!
 

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I have that frame grabber. It sits in my garage with all the other useless stuff that I thought might work. I found it awkward to use and difficult to control without crushing bees. Now the frame perch is different and I use mine all the time - nice tool.

To the OP, disregard the "man up" comment and get the man something that he will be confident and comfortable. As mentioned goatskin are definitely not sting proof - particularly once wet with sweat. Bees have no trouble stinging right through goatskin gloves. Cowhide gloves are pretty close to sting proof. Dandant has these: https://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=765



If gloves get in the way sometimes would it be helpful to purchase one of those frame clamps? Has anyone tried those before? Most of my beekeeping equipment arrived today but I thought about the clamp and possibly that frame holder that hooks onto the side of the hive.
 

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Why are people continuing to talk about manipulating frames and frame grabbers, etc when the original question was just about whether to wear gloves WHILE REVERSING HIVE BODIES? :scratch:

Going off topic is just going to confuse new beekeepers.
 
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