Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for recomendations on gloves, I have to wear gloves as I have bad reactions to stings, unfortunately right now I have 7 stings on my hands and all but one came with gloves on. I have to wash my gloves as they get pretty dirty doing cut-outs and general use. I think they are holding up and would like to know what type of glove would hold up to use and still protect from stings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
Re: Glove recomendations

I always get the fewest stings in my hands when I am bare-handed and very careful where and how I place my fingers. If I am careful not to put any part of my hand or fingers directly on a bee, I rarely get stung on any part of my hands. The bees that are interested in attacking me are after various parts of my face, not my hands or any other part of my body. I only get stung on my hands and fingers when I am careless and crush or pinch a bee directly with my fingers or hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
Re: Glove recomendations

You might also try disposable, nitrile gloves. They are "stick resistant" for needles and such in medical applications. They fit closely so you still have excellent dexterity. I would not say they are 100% sting proof but it takes a very determined bee to get a sting through them. If one does, it is not usually a bad sting and the stinger comes out very easily just by pulling the glove away from the skin.

Do a search on nitrile gloves and you will find a thread that includes a source and an item number.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
Re: Glove recomendations

Use the Meyer or as they are listed above the goatskin ones. They are tough enough for commercial work, last the whole season, and will keep the stings off. If they get dirty just wash in hot water. They will be a bit stiff after drying but wear them for about 5 minutes driving or some other task and they soften right up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Re: Glove recomendations

I just goatskin gloves that extend way up to my elbows. I've never been stung through them, and they allow a fair amount of dexterity when I'm working the hives.

I've also used nitrile (twice), and have been stung through them (once).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,292 Posts
Re: Glove recomendations

I vote with Joseph Clemens, use acre, and you bare hands, You will learn to use the smoke to clear the top bars, then pick a frame without squishing a bee. You cannot be too sensitive to stings, you are alive after 7 stings. Your body will adapt to the stings with time.

Roland Diehnelt
Linden Apiary, Est. 1852
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Re: Glove recomendations

The only time I've been stung on the hand was when I stupidly wore my dark stretch construction gloves (bear paws). Because my hives are right next to my ponds, I have mosquitos to deal with so I always spray with repellant (not that I know that helps with the bees, tho).

Another thing I do is puff my hands pretty good with my smoker. Like Joseph said, I just work slow and methodically & even during frame-by-frame exams, they don't even crawl on my hands.

If you have localized swelling, redness and itching for some number of days - that's a normal reaction. I always bring a single-edge razor blade with me so if I am stung, I try to scrape the stinger free without mashing the poison sac.

Whatever works - right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,035 Posts
Re: Glove recomendations

You might also try disposable, nitrile gloves. They are "stick resistant" for needles and such in medical applications.
I can guarantee that no nitrile glove in any medical setting has ever been labled "stick resistant". Rembember they are not dealing with a harmless bee sting, they are dealing with dirty needles and things like AIDS and HEP B.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,097 Posts
If you can take seven (even seven clothing stings) without anaphylaxis, then we're talking pain/discomfort rather than serious threat. Which is a REAL good thing if you're doing cutouts!

So, if you react "enthusiastically" to stings non-anaphylactically but still need to work bees, you're a great candidate for desensitization therapy from an allergist. Or, if it's at all tolerable, get stung MORE until your body develops more tolerance.

I'm in the high-risk group of folks who get (typically) fewer than 20 stings a year. I go gloveless (and often sleeveless) to give the girls a chance to offer "feedback" about my technique :), and because I think it's less hard on the bees. So far my sting reactions are minimal-normal, couple hours of swelling. But as an atopic who also has asthma, I keep the option of desensitization in my back pocket in case the price of this "hobby" goes south one of these days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
aaaaa, i use rubber gloves. The kind for washing dishes. Easy to clean and inexpensive and you can feel what your doing with out squashing any bees.
A bee can sting threw leather gloves.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
Re: Glove recomendations

I can guarantee that no nitrile glove in any medical setting has ever been labled "stick resistant". Rembember they are not dealing with a harmless bee sting, they are dealing with dirty needles and things like AIDS and HEP B.
I don't understand why some people feel the need to be so combative in forums like this. This can be a great place to share information and opinions. I placed the words "stick resistant" in quotes because I was not sure of the language but there are indeed, medical supply sources that indicate nitrile gloves offer "superior resistance to punctures". Here is one of several that can be found with an internet search.

http://www.themedsupplyguide.com/nitrile-gloves/

Here is a link to a thread from this site about nitrile gloves. The thread also includes a link to a You-Tube video of the poster poking the gloves with a needle and a knife indicating a certain degree of "stick resistance" IN MY OPINION.

http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=218155
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I go barehanded when I'm doing mild stuff and if I really have to get into the hive I use the kitchen type gloves because they are thinner and I can feel the beesI baby powder my hand before I put them into gloves. I haven't been stung thru the gloves yet but I move pretty slow. If the gloves get stung I make sure and throw them in the washer to get the stinger pheromone out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
I like the kimberly clark "safeskin" purple nitrile gloves. I can get them for about $12 for a box of 100 from Walmart.com. Shipping is another dollar. They last me up to three trips to the bee yard if you wash them before you take them off. Or if you aren't cheap like me, throw them away after one use.

I haven't been stung through the purple ones yet. I have used the cheaper, thinner blue ones. You get a better feel for the bees in the thin, cheap ones. Even in the thin ones, the stings are really minor.

For size reference, my hand is 7 1/2 inches around the knuckles and a "medium" works for me.

I don't know if I can post a link but here's trying:

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=10715980&findingMethod=rr&
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
just FYI from a retired Medic of 20 years those purple gloves or blue ones are not puncture proof period. any one saying they are sting proof and telling a new beek they are, is not good. and when some one is asking for a tough glove it seams to me more people on this fourm are anti-Glove or think less of a beekeeper if they wear gloves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,035 Posts
Carl F, Yep, I see where the web site uses the term, so you are right. For clarification purposes no one in the medical feild would ever consider nitrile gloves to be "stick resistance" as stated a needle stick in a medical setting is a life and death situation. Now, can we all just g`g` get along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Bucko gloves!!! Nice, soft gloves that. You can even wash these glvoes in the washing machine and they come out nice every time. (Don't dry them)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
I am new and bought a pair of the vented goat skin gloves from dadant. they are clumsy and i almost dropped a frame of bees my first time out. last time using them, saving for the days when the girls are mad and my current choice would not work out as planned.

so i decided that going to down size, i use nitrile gloves, mainly to keep the gunk off my hands. but they make me feel better, what ever there "resistance" they are rubber not steel. but i can tell you from using them in construction; painting, dry wall mud, clean up. they are pretty tough and way stronger then plain latex gloves. is kevlar "100% puncher resistant"? no, a bullet made of certain materials and a high enough velocity would go through, but, they are still called "bullet proof vests".

on a side note, last time in the yard i slit the tip of the nitrile glove on something, think it was the hive tool, but i saw the slit and knew it was there. i considered changing the glove out, but it was hot and my hands were drenched, shall we say "prune hands". new glove would have been a bear to get on and i decided to troop trough.
i was holding a frame of bees looking for the queen when i felt something strung on my finger. i thought at first i was stung, but then i looked and one of the girls was drinking my sweat through the hole. i could feel her little tongue against my left index finger, that grossed me out and i almost dropped the frame. i shooed her away, then kicked my self in the butt for not taking a picture because the camera was in my pocket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
I've been using Nitrile gloves this past year, when I use gloves. They can be hot to wear, but your hands are clean after using them. When they are too hot to wear the bees are working so well that gloves aren't necassary.

Never liked canvas gloves.
Rubber coated gloves w/ arm gauntlets were always too ungainly(?).
Used to wear leather gloves w/ cloth arm bands separate.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top