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Long as the politicians don't mess with glyphostae over where i live, Europeans can do what they want.

Gotta wonder if they have thought through how they will control the weeds now though.
 

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Maybe since they banned glyphosate LOL, they will find getting good per acre crops a bit more of a challenge. ;)
Some challenge would be good, for all I care.
Food should be more expensive and reflect the real costs of the production (including the collateral damages it involves).
50% of the food ends in the local landfills anyway.

Of course, I am an idiot - trying to grow own organic potatoes and extract my own honey.
The local "poor" keep laughing at idiots like me.
 

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If the industry does not find a similar (and as cheap) product, it will cause increase in CO2 emissions and loads of work and lower net incomes for the farmers.
CO2 emissions came two ways: the use of fossil fuels in the tractors and plowing and tilling the fields and the emissions from earth compared to no-tillage farming.

Which one is better for the environment? I don´t know.
 

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Yes, Juhani, it is well to be cautious with simplistic solutions to complex problems.

As for making people work harder for their living that would be tough medicine to swallow. The public pushback might be much harder to live with than the perceived villain.

According to legend it did not play out well for the aristocratic lady who replied "then let them eat cake", when told that the peasants had no bread!

Many countries are far far short of self sufficiency on food. Try running for public office on the platform of population management!
 

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I suppose this is because the 2013 ban on neonicitinoids has worked out so well for them. Six years after all neonics were banned from pollinator-attracting plants, there has been no effect on colony loss in the EU. After article, upon article, upon article claiming that neonics were a primary, if not THE primary, cause of colony collapse.

Now glyphosate will be banned with equally sound "science."
 

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Yes, Juhani, it is well to be cautious with simplistic solutions to complex problems.

As for making people work harder for their living that would be tough medicine to swallow. ........Try running for public office on the platform of population management!
It maybe tougher but it is the case we have.
Something need to happen to stop the public irresponsibility and hypocrisy of the western world.
Heck, people in the US will even revolt over 5 cent charge per a plastic bag. That's called hypocrisy.

One of my landlords takes the food thrown away for his garden compost.
Next time I am there, I should take a picture.

(Added - Why, I just googled his blog and he already has a good entry right on the subject.
https://www.oneseedfarm.com/single-post/2019/01/11/Adventures-of-Garbage-Man
)

This is not sustainable.
Food should be eaten, NOT thrown away.
As it is now - too much hypocrisy.
 

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This country has depended on glyphosate for half a century. All of the sudden, it is blamed for killing off honey bees.

There are not many active farmers today that can remember life without glyphosate in the US. I don't know when it became available in Europe, but suspect it was around the same time frame.

But I am sure they have it all figured out over there. Good luck to them. They will need it.
 

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No argument on the wastage. Typical supermarket item has an average of 1000 miles of transportation from production to consumption. Much of it arrives questionable and if not used smartly becomes garbage. Strawberries air freighted in from south america is one item that shocked me last winter! Easy to cherry pick examples where we waste a lot.

Still much of the population is dependant on bulk calories, yes corn fills a lot of hungry guts, and this bulk production consumes a lot of fossil fuel. I can remember back to the days of discussions about fuel and top soil savings anticipated from by the zero till agriculture made possible by defoliants and ripening agents such as glyphosates etc.

As long as we continue to produce and condone such products as alcohol and tobacco, I think it rather silly to get all hysterical about any minute spinoff from roundup.
 

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It is like people complaining about GMO plants, they do not realize that it takes a lot more herbicides, fungicides and insecticides to produce a crop of non GMO than it does to produce a GMO crop. So which is worst for the environment.
 

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I can vouch that glyphosate does not even harm bees.

Because I use it to control weeds around the hives, they are sprayed usually around 3 times a year and in the process it gets on any flying bees and the landing boards, no obvious harm to the bees at all, in fact my bees are pretty healthy and honey production considerably better than the national avaerage.

Could it be that glyphosate does no harm to bees at all, but is guilty of killing weeds, which bees feed on, thereby in the mind of some Europeans, being harmful to bees. By reducing their forage? If that is the argument, it would apply to any method of killing weeds, even gangs of laborers doing it by hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
It is like people complaining about GMO plants, they do not realize that it takes a lot more herbicides, fungicides and insecticides to produce a crop of non GMO than it does to produce a GMO crop. So which is worst for the environment.
Could it be that those pesticides are tailored to the GMO specific? Also, GMO means transgenic: when was the last time you saw a tomato mate with a fish in Arkansas, granted many funny things can happen in that state?

Earthboy
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I can vouch that glyphosate does not even harm bees.

Because I use it to control weeds around the hives, they are sprayed usually around 3 times a year and in the process it gets on any flying bees and the landing boards, no obvious harm to the bees at all, in fact my bees are pretty healthy and honey production considerably better than the national avaerage.

Could it be that glyphosate does no harm to bees at all, but is guilty of killing weeds, which bees feed on, thereby in the mind of some Europeans, being harmful to bees. By reducing their forage? If that is the argument, it would apply to any method of killing weeds, even gangs of laborers doing it by hand.
Please Google how pesticide-treated seeds express the chemicals systemically. That is through its roots, stems, leaves, pollen, nectar, and flowers.

Examples of systemic pesticides:

>>>Because neonics are found throughout targeted plants, including the pollen and nectar, bees are contaminated when they forage, resulting in contaminated honey.

They have been available for use in New Zealand for more than 20 years, but remain subject to strict regulations.

Pesticide traces in NZ honey surprises researcher:

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11934014
 

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Earthboy, please explain what pesticide treated seeds have to do with glyphosate? I'm confused. ;)

Or perhaps, you are confused. Too much Google has confused things for you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Earthboy, please explain what pesticide treated seeds have to do with glyphosate? I'm confused. ;)

Or perhaps, you are confused. Too much Google has confused things for you?
Roger that:

Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide and crop desiccant. It is an organophosphorus compound, specifically a phosphonate, which acts by inhibiting the plant enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase. It is used to kill weeds, especially annual broadleaf weeds and grasses that compete with crops. It was discovered to be an herbicide by Monsanto chemist John E. Franz in 1970. Monsanto brought it to market for agricultural use in 1974 under the trade name Roundup. . . .


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyphosate
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Some challenge would be good, for all I care.
Food should be more expensive and reflect the real costs of the production (including the collateral damages it involves).
50% of the food ends in the local landfills anyway.

Of course, I am an idiot - trying to grow own organic potatoes and extract my own honey.
The local "poor" keep laughing at idiots like me.
I love the TASTE of home-grown corn, potato, tomato, etc. you name it. Of course, my honey is far better tasting than the long-shelf-life-enhanced, generic honey from any big stores.
 
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