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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's late summer here in Christchurch New Zealand and the hive is working well. It's a reasonably strong & has been reasonably productive this year (to date)
I have found that german wasps (They're yellow & black stripped wasps I know as German wasp) have started entering a hive which I have here at home in the garden.
They seem to be entering every 2 or 3 minutes so it's not many at present but maybe it's a start of what I don't want.
I have been sitting watching and they seem to hover around the hive for a bit then get down low in the flight path of the incoming bees and just stroll on in there with them.
I have tried reducing the hives entrance by 50% to make it more busy for them and hopefully will get the message from the "guards" that their presents is not wanted but... it's as if they are cousie-bro's and just wander on in.

Has anybody any suggestions what might deter them ?
I do have plans to move the hive in a week or two and maybe that might do the trick, assuming they don't reside there over night as well.

Would appreciate your thoughts.
Cheers
 

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You may try a roober screen that force the HBs to enter from above the main hive entrance.

Make a wooden frame from 3/4"x3/4" stock. Frame as wide as the hive body and about 4 inches tall. Cover with #8 hardware cloth. Cut HB entrance notch in upper 3/4x3/4 cross member. Attach with bottem of frame flush with landing board. Hopefully the wasp will not find the new entrance.

I call them European hornets. A couple of years ago I had a bad problem with them but luckily found the tree where they were nesting. I cut the tree and burned them out - after spray and gasoline alone failed to kill them. Fire worked. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the suggestion. Its appreciated but I don't understand what a #8 hardware cloth is.
Is it a wire mesh or something like a fly screen type mesh one would find on doors and windows or is it a piece of cloth, as in fabric?
I imagine it's something we might have over here in New Zealand but we may call it something else.
What sort of size is the opening for the bees to access through this? Is it a substantially reduced size from the normal full width of the hive or just couple of inches wide in opening/access size?
Thanks again
Cheers
Will
 

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do a search here for "robber screen" the wasps will increase the number of attackers till they overwhelm your hive and kill all your bees, thus the advice to search and destroy. a robber screen tricks them into trying to get into the hive at the point where the odors are escaping (through the screen) but the actual exit through the screen is a few inches away. one thing that will help immediatly is to reduce your entrance as small as you can-that makes it easier to guard. good luck,mike
 

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I think we need a better identification on the wasps in question, first.

"German wasps" sound like German yellowjackets to me, Vespula germanica. These will enter beehives, and may steal some honey late in the season, but usually seem to cause little enough damage around here that they aren't worth bothering.

"European hornets" are hornets, Vespa crabro, which are much larger than yellowjackets. I have no experience with them (they do not live around here yet), but understand they will raid honey bee hives at times.

The videos circulating on the Internet of hornets attacking honey bee colonies are mostly of Asian giant hornets, Vespa mandarinia, in southeast Asia.

If the wasps in your situation are just wandering into the hive and the bees are not reacting defensively, they probably aren't taking enough to cause the bees any alarm.
 

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#8 hardware cloth is wire mesh, 8 squares per inch, similar to window screen, but a little larger. We use it mostly for screened bottom boards, but also for robber screens and other uses. In a pinch, you could probably substitute window screen for a robber screen. Make the opening about 3/4" wide on the top bar of the robber screen, facing up; bees can find their way out but robbers usually can't figure out how to get in. :D
 

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This is a response on a simular subject on a different forum. This is what I am going to do late summer. You may not have Frontline there, but maybe you can look it up and have something simular.

I had several underground nests in my yard. I read a researcher in CA found that Frontline dog & cat flea killer (1-2 drops to a can of cat food or tuna) will kill the nest by the foragers taking baited meat back to the nest where they feed the brood. I tried the method a year & half ago and I have not had a yellow Jacket problem since. I would only do this towards the middle or end of summer because thats when the YJ's are searching for meat more than sweets. To keep local pets and critters from getting the baited meat I placed the can in a birdgage to allow the YJ's in and out.
I tried the store bought traps and they captured a lot of yellows jackets but just like honeybees the YJ's kept putting out new foragers. Hope it helps
 

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Great tip on the Frontline/catfood YJ control...I will try that. YJ's zap me more than my bees. Last year we had a flying critter that a google search ID's as a Bee Wolf...is this the same as/similar to the German wasp? This thing didn't enter the hive, just hoovered around outside the entrance and picked of a bee every so often...From what I could tell did not impact the hive health, but did make them irritable. Any ideas on what can be done about these? Maybe a tennis racket?
 

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I use butterfly net and catch a few of those hornets, tie a short string to their leg, with a white feather (chicken or duck dawn) on the end.
I than let them go, one at a time and follow them to their nest.
 

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I don't recommend using the Frontline-in-meat tactic. Such use is really only intended as emergency use in extreme situations, not just to rid areas of yellowjackets.

Yellowjackets are beneficial insects, despite the inconvience they give to many beekeepers. They are predatory insects, and kill large numbers of pests. They also fill vital roles in ecosystems.

"Bee wolves" are even less of a problem. The number of bees that they would kill around a hive would have no effect on a colony.

Just because a predatory insect may eat a few bees, don't assume that all predators need to be exterminated.
 
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