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We will be planting a garden this year and it will be in the same location as my hives. We will have to treat for pests. Are there anything we can use that will not harm bees? We normally use a powder to keep the unwanted pests away. Is there anything I can do?
 

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Look online for more organic ideas for pest control...
 

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Always read and follow the label directions on anything you choose to use to "treat for pests." If you have a choice in what to use, choose something that is not harmful to honey bees and/or native pollinators. There are some pesticides that go on wet and when dried don't pose a threat to bees. This would mean applying the pesticide when bees/native pollinators are not present - meaning night. Some commercial operations are reluctant to pay overtime for someone to apply pesticides at night but as a home gardener that shouldn't be a big obstacle for you.

One of my yards is in the middle of my apple orchard. I have chosen (for the time being at least) not to treat for scab and other things. This means no herbicides, fungicides, nor pesticides. You need to decide what is most important to you - the bees or the products of your garden. If both are important you'll need to change the way you have treated for pests in the past.
 

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[QUOTE;1070122]Look online for more organic ideas for pest control...[/QUOTE]

Do not confuse organic with something that is safe for honeybees. Any product that will kill insects can/may kill honeybees.

Tom
 

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There are dormant oil sprays for fruit trees (smothers eggs prior to leaf/blossoming),
kaolin clay spray (barrier method on fruit),
other barrier methods such as fine netting for vegie garden, fruits, berries,
pheromone lure traps (targets particular insect pest),
bug zappers,
DE earth,
attract natural preditors (birds, other good bugs)
sticky traps,
beer traps for slugs,
hand picking,
camouflage odors (confuses pest)
soil cultural methods
and more.
 

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One thing I have to be very helpful, is to always apply wet insecticides as late as possible in the day. I even spray some of mine at night when the bees have ceased foraging. Also time it to coincide with drier weather, I believe insecticide is less harmful when it has dried. I usually have 3 or 4 hives sitting within 20 feet of my garden. While I try to limit any spraying, at times I do have to deal with the insects. In three years I have never seen any significant bee kills from what I do.
To answer the earlier comment about what do bees work in a garden, they work my tomatoes, bell peppers, hot peppers, yellow and zuc squash, cucumbers, and green beans. They also are seen in the sweet corn and field corn we grow. Even though the corn does not bloom, they are all in the tops, getting pollen I guess.
 
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