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Hives at the broncos training camp


and of course, snow today lol
 

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Discussion Starter #63 (Edited)
Finally got the time to do a careful inspection of my 9 hives.

The 5 new packages are growing, but not as fast as I would like. These packages did not get fed when installed due to extreme robbing pressure at the time. Fortunately, the inspection found that 4 had grown enough to put on a second brood box. One was lagging, and, since robbing pressure has passed, I could safely put on a feed jar. I am seeing lots of orientation flights from the 4, each afternoon. Based on the amount of capped brood, all 5 are ready to explode with new bees. I am happy to see each one is building population, now.

Of the 4 over-wintered hives, 2 were doing some serious honey collecting and each had two full mediums of capped honey. Both should'a been supered a few weeks ago. The 3rd is looking good, with close to a full medium, but not ready to be supered, yet.

The 4th over-wintered hive, had, unfortunately, lost its queen and gone laying-worker. This is relatively common along the Front Range where our violent Springtime weather swings (i.e., the "Front Range Roller Coaster") can prevent post-swarm queen mating, and the hive is then caught flat-footed after swarming with no eggs/brood of the appropriate age to requeen itself. This hive had a full medium super of honey, and lots of nectar and pollen, but a reduced population. Personally, once a hive goes laying-working, I consider it lost cause. I will combine this hive with the weak package mentioned above, so it will still do some good.

Because our nectar flow is pretty much over for the year, I see major feeding on the to-do list come this Fall.

All the hives got sunshades, too, to mitigate the worst of our brutal mid-day high-altitude Summer Sun.


Before:





After:




The bee pond is doing well, too:








.
 

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My hives are doing ok. I have one that is building up well and is at about 4 medium boxes filled with honey, one that never built up well, and I split when I found them trying to swarm. My package is doing ok, and growing slowly. We have been getting rain about once a week for the past 3 weeks which will probably help out the plants and the honey flow, we will see how things look the next time Inspect my hives.
 

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yep, I have (hopfully) a week of linden left and then my flow is done for the year
I have found in our area the nectar often stops but there is still a pollen flow and the pollen keeps most lines brood rearing chewing thew reserves.
I find that if I create a brood break.. either let them raize there own queen (then replace with a good one) or use a 48 hour cell I save a lot of feed/can take more honey as I man not feeding a mounths worth of brood rearing

based on Seeley (2001) feed conversion it takes about 2 quarts of 1:1 to feed a frame of brood, around a frame a week if the queen is slowed down and at 1k a day.... across an apairy that adds up fast

Make lemonade, pull some nucs, requeen some old queens and start prepping for winter. nucs/singles take less feed to get threw and have almost the same performance come spring as overwintered dubble deep
 

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Discussion Starter #66
MSL - you raise some interesting points that are unique to our Front Range area: Since our honey flow stops for the year sometime in mid-to-late June, how to keep the hives productive, or at least not be a honey black hole from July until the hives naturally shut down for Winter around October?

My thought was to run Carniolans, since they are good at scaling hive population to amount of nectar coming in. But, it could be a good time to split and feed, so that the splits will be "over-wintered" colonies the next Spring. At least you then some see honey production benefit for all the feeding done.
 

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Yep!!!
CIMG0581.jpg
This weekends VSH Carniolan Virgins siting in my queen bank

The other thing I have drifted towards this year is a single deep brood chamber... puts more honey in a harvestabul position and is cheaper to feed. I had very good luck overwintering singles last year(made a lot of splits). so far I am digging it

and let us not forget the brood break alows you to kick the snot out of your mite load with a single OAV, Giveing your hives a leg up on the onslaught of mite bombs that plagues our area
last year, I put the stickys back on a few hives for them to clean up late AUG(as you know no flow) and one of the 8f must have been the robbing king, they filled and capped a 8f deep and got a few extra mite treatments for there trouble.

The outher thing to consider is not to go in to winter with an older worn out queen
if you havent give DR Milbrath work a read
https://static1.squarespace.com/sta...510002000326/Milbrath_SustainableFallNucs.pdf

She had 63% survival in her dubble deep production hives, and 87% in 5 frame nucs placed in singles. This was attributed to the fresh young queen in the nuc
 

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yep, I have (hopfully) a week of linden left and then my flow is done for the year
In the 3 full years I have been doing this the flow seems to be all over the place for when it stops/hives stop gaining wait here (near Ft Collins). I think some of this is my management, some of it is weather related, and some of it may be hive size/strength/gentics related. In 2017 my new package stopped gaining weight about august 15th, in 2018 the same hive stopped gaining wait early June, and in 2019 that hive stopped gaining wait in the end of july. In 2018 this hive superseded the queen, then I accidentally squished her later in the season (i think it was 2018).
 

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I think the flow is still going in my neck of the woods. I have put out empty honey jars (still sticky) and the bees are still ignoring them.
 

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Steve, here in Louisville we had a bad snowstorm and a low of 8 degrees on April 13th.
Some of the ornamental fruit trees were already blooming and it killed the flowers. But it also killed the other fruit tree buds that were starting to form.
So my apple, peach, pear and plum trees didn't bloom.
Dandelions saved us. Linden trees did well.

I don't know if Elmer had a similar occurrence.

How you doing?
 

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Steve, here in Louisville we had a bad snowstorm and a low of 8 degrees on April 13th.
I think that cold snap also what that got several of my fruit trees this year. I saw flowers on some trees before that cold snap, and I think I lost a lot of buds. A few of the trees are new, but a few are also well established. I think it got down to about 15 degrees here, so not quite as cold, but still enough to get all of the buds.
 

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elmer & Arnie,

I also lost several well established fruit and ornamental trees at that time so I missed the early nectar/pollen flow. I'm in my early 80's and the good news is that I got a new hip, and that has increased my mobility in the foothills. In '21 I pray for more early rain and no late killing frost. Made two NUC's last week and did two combines yesterday.

Cheers,
Steve
====
 

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For weeks and weeks, every storm system that has teased us has fizzled out in Golden and magically reappeared east of I-25, or alternately veered to the north or south of us. I'm trying to look at the bright side and be thankful that at least no rain means no hail either. Also thankful that we have a well, or our water bill would be astronomical, as I'm trying to grow, along with veggies, as many flowers as possible for the bees. On my brief excursions into the neighborhood, I've hardly seen any flowers in anyone else's yard (except a nursery a few blocks away), and it looks as if the environs of Lakeside are being turned into an asphalt jungle, so fewer weeds blooming too.

Fruit trees in our neighborhood were a big bust this year - 95% of the flower buds were killed off by that late spring cold snap/snow. My fruit trees are for the most part still too young to bloom much, but I'd been counting on the neighbors' apple and crabapple trees, and I never saw a single bloom on any of them. My Saskatchewan-bred cherry bushes made a fairly decent comeback, but that was about it. Dandelions were our savior.

On the good side, I made my first-ever successful walkaway split in June and now have one booming hive and one small building one (the split)...
 

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I extracted the honey from the one hive that actually produced extra honey this year and ended up with about 7 gallons from 3 supers. Something is still flowing well here because the bees had no interest in cleaning out the frames or extractor when I left them out in the yard.
 

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Are the wild fires affecting anyone (other than the smoke)?

Right now the only thing I have at my house if a odd orange/yellow tint outside from all the smoke.
 
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